Making an interval [i.e. eating; drinking; talking] after saying Kerias Shema Sheal Hamita/Hamapil-Part 1

Making an interval [i.e. eating; drinking; talking] after saying Kerias Shema Sheal Hamita/Hamapil:[1]

One may not eat, drink, or speak after reciting Kerias Shema Sheal Hamita [even if he did not yet say the blessing of Hamapil[2], and certainly if it was already recited]. Rather, he is to go to sleep immediately after its recital.[3] [Some Poskim[4] rule that if one speaks between Hamapil and falling asleep, then the blessing is considered to have been said in vain. Due to this, some communities, and individuals, are accustomed not to recite the blessing of Hamapil with Hashem’s name, lest they speak in between.[5] Other Poskim[6], however, rule it is not considered a blessing in vain, and one is thus not to abstain from saying the blessing due to worry that one may have to speak afterwards.[7] The final ruling follows the latter opinion.[8]]

 

Summary:

One may not initially make an interval of talking, or eating/drinking, after the recital of Kerias Shema, even if he did not yet say Hamapil, and certainly if Hamapil was already said. Nonetheless, if an interval was made after Hamapil, the majority of Poskim rule that it is not considered a blessing in vain.

Q&A

May one eat, drink or talk after Kerias Shema/Hamapil, in a time of need?

Coming up in Part 2!

If one made a long interval after saying Hamapil, is the blessing to be repeated?

Coming up in Part 2!

If one fell asleep after saying Hamapil, and then woke up, may he eat or drink even initially?

Coming up in Part 2!

May one read a book, or learn Torah after reciting Kerias Shema/Hamapil?

Coming up in Part 2!

 

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[1] Rama 239:1; Beis Yosef 239; Kol Bo 29 “All Israel is accustomed…”; Rokeaich 327; Rabbeinu Yerucham Nesiv 3:2; Orchos Chaim Kerias Shema in name of Rabbeinu Asher; Sefer Haminhagos of Rabbeinu Asher p. 17; Rabbeinu Manoach Tefila 7:2; Leket Yosher p. 45

Letter of law: The Poskim imply that from the letter of the law, it is permitted to speak and make an interval after Hamapil, as it is no different than speaking after the blessing of Hanosen Lasechvi Bina, prior to hearing the roosters crow, and it is only due to custom that an interval is not made after Hamapil. [See Leket Yosher p. 45; Implication of Rishonim ibid who write it as a mere custom, or custom of some; All Poskim in future footnotes; Tehilas Chaim 2:41 in name of Kuntrus Alei Terufa that this prohibition is not mentioned in the Rishonim, and the Rama brought it as a mere custom, and it is better to speak many times after saying it than to not say it at all; Orchos Chaim Spinka 239:3 in name of Meorei Or that the custom is to drink and speak when necessary]

[2] M”B 239:4

[3] The reason: As the verse states “Yomru Bilivavchem Al Mishkavam Vedomeh Sela.” [Rama ibid; Kol Bo ibid]

[4] Implication of Seder Hayom ibid who rules it is a blessing in vain if the blessing is said prior to drifting off to sleep; Siddur Beis Oveid; Ben Ish Chaiy Pekudei 12 “My custom, and the custom of my forefathers, as well as many of Israel, is not to say the blessing of Hamapil with Hashem’s name, lest we speak in between, and some Poskim rule that if one speaks it is a blessing in vain.”; Implication of M”B 239:4 and Biur Halacha 239 “Samuch”; Possible way of learning Admur 6:8 and M”A 6:8  who rule regarding one who slept, awoke and then went back to sleep that Hamapil is to be recited without a blessing. This is based on the Seder Hayom who rules that Hamapil is similar to Birchas Hanehnin, and we thus see that Admur ibid does suspect for an interval; See Shevet Hakehasi 1:101; Teshuvos Vehanhagos 2:131; Piskeiy Teshuvos 239:3

[5] Siddur Beis Oveid; Ben Ish Chaiy ibid that so is his custom, and the custom of Jerusalem Jewry; See Shevet Hakehasi 1:101; Teshuvos Vehanhagos 2:131; Piskeiy Teshuvos 239:3 footnote 16

[6] Implication of Rishonim ibid; Kneses Hagedola 239 and Elya Raba 239:3, that Hamapil is said “Al Minhag Haolam”, brought in Machatzis Hashekel 239:3 and P”M 239 A”A 3; Chayeh Adam 35:4; Makor Chaim of Chavos Yair Kitzur Halachos [permits saying Maariv after Hamapil]; Siddur Yaavetz permits talking in a time of great need; Biur Hagr”a 432 [that even if one does not fall asleep, it is not a blessing in vain]; Ashel Avraham Butchach Tinyana 239; Maharitz Chayos Brachos 11b; Bireich Es Avraham p. 102 that so is the custom; Yifei Laleiv 239:2; Tehilas Chaim 2:41 in name of Kuntrus Alei Terufa [brought in previous footnotes]; Orchos Chaim Spinka 239:3 in name of Meorei Or [permits even initially to talk]; Aruch Hashulchan 239:6 “Certainly it is not similar to the laws of Hefsek after other blessings”; Birchas Habayis 31:2; Peri Hasadeh 1:93; Hisorerus Teshuvah 1:114; Kaf Hachaim 239:7; Halichos Shlomo 13:15; Beir Moshe 1:63; Tzitz Eliezer 7:27; Yechaveh Daas 4:21; Rivivos Efraim 6:123; 8:81; Piskeiy Teshuvos 239:3

[7] The reason: As the blessing of Hamapil was instituted to be said on the general benefit of sleeping received by people, and not on one’s personal sleep. It is no different than speaking after the blessing of Hanosen Lasechvi Bina, prior to hearing the roosters crow. [Kneses Hagedola ibid; Elya Raba 239:3; Machatzis Hashekel 239:3; P”M 239 A”A 3; Chayeh Adam 35:4; Maharitz Chayos ibid; Orchois Chaim Spinka; Bireich Es Avraham p. 102 that so is the custom; Yifei Laleiv 239:2; Kaf Hachaim ibid] Alternatively, it is because the blessing was established to be recited upon one preparing himself to sleep. [Ashel Avraham Butchach ibid]

[8] As so rule majority of Poskim, brought in previous footnote, and so would apply according to all Poskim in coming footnotes, who permit eating or talking after Hamapil

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