Chasan doing Melacha and business

Melacha and Business:[1]

It is forbidden for the Chasan to do Melacha or business in the marketplace throughout the period of Simcha [three or seven days depending on Besula/Beula as explained in A].[2]

Mechila/Receving permission from Kallah to do Melacha:[3] The above prohibition applies even if the Kallah is Mochel on her Simcha, and allows him to do Melacha and go to work.[4] [However, some Poskim[5] rule that his applies only if the Kallah is a Besula, if however the Kallah is a Beula, then she can forgive her honor and he may go to work.[6] Likewise, some Poskim[7] are lenient to allow a Chasan to perform Melacha in the privacy of his home if the Kallah is Mochel, even if she is a Besula.[8]]

Haircut and laundry:[9] It is permitted for a Chasan [and Kallah] to cut his hair and launder/iron his clothing during Sheva Brachos.[10]

 

Summary:
A Chasan is forbidden in Melacha all seven days if he married a Besula. If he married a Beula it is only for three days. If the Kallah is Mochel, the Chasan may do Melacha in the privacy of his home, and if he married a Beula he may do Melacha even in public.

Q&A

May the Kallah do Melacha during the Sheva Brachos?
Some Poskim[11] rule the Kallah is forbidden in Melacha just as the Chasan. Other Poskim[12] however are lenient from the second day and onwards. She may certainly do Melacha in private with her husband’s consent.[13]

May the Chasan/Kallah do Melacha in order to prevent monetary loss?[14]
Some Poskim[15] rule it is forbidden for him to do Melacha even in a case of loss. Other Poskim[16] rule it is permitted. Practically, he may do Melacha in private if his Kallah is Mochel.

Q&A on definition of Melacha

What is defined as Melacha?[17]
All matters that are forbidden on Chol Hamoed are forbidden for the Chasan/Kallah.[18] It is likewise forbidden to perform any Melacha that is troublesome and prevents one from properly focusing on rejoicing his wife.[19] All Melachos that are food related, and are permitted to perform on Yom Tov are likewise permitted to be performed by the Chasan/Kallah. Likewise, Simcha related Melachos are permitted.[20]

May a Chasan tie Tzitzis to his new Tallis during Sheva Brachos?[21]
Yes.

May a Chasan/Kallah write during Sheva Brachos?[22]
It is permitted for the Chasan/Kallah to briefly write during Sheva Brachos, although one may not to engage in a long writing session in order not to nullify rejoicing his wife. It is certainly permitted to jot down Chidushei Torah.

May one’s business partner run the business during Sheva Brachos?[23]
Yes.

May a Chasan who is a Shochet, Shect during Sheva Brachos?[24]
Yes. He may even Shecht for the public, if other Shochtim are not available and it will lead to a shortage of meat.[25]

May a Chasan/Kallah cut nails during Sheva Brachos?[26]
Yes.

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[1] Michaber and Rama 64/1

[2] The reason: As a) He is obligated to rejoice his wife. And b) A Chasan is like a king. [Chelkas Mechokek 64/2]

[3] Chelkas Mechokek 64/2 and Beis Shmuel 64/2 in explanation of the novelty of Rama ibid who repeats the same ruling of Michaber that a Chasan may not do Melacha; Hamakneh, brought in Pischeiy Teshuvah 64/3; Aruch Hashulchan 64/5; Kitzur SHU”A 149/12; Poskim in Nitei Gavriel 56 footnote 2

Other Poskim: Some Poskim rule it is permitted for the Kallah to be Mochel and have her Chasan do work. [Chida in Shiyurei Bracha 64 and Chaim Sheol 2/38-Samech]

[4] The reason: As a Chasan is like a king and hence may not do Melacha just like a King, irrelevant of the Kallah’s permission. [Chelkas Mechokek 64/2]

[5] Hamakneh, brought in Pischeiy Teshuvah 64/3; Aruch Hashulchan ibid

[6] The reason: As only when one marries a Besula is he called a true Chasan in his own right that is similar to a king. [ibid]

[7] See Dovev Meisharim 3/47; Nitei Gavriel 56/2

[8] The reason: As a king is only forbidden from doing Melacha in public, and hence if the wife is Mochel, neither reason is relevant to prohibit the Chasan from doing Melkacha in private. [ibid]

[9] Michaber 342/1; Shach 342/11; Taz 342/5; Kneses Hagedila 342/1; Masas Binyamin 19; Tur 342; Ramban in Toras Hadam; Rabbeinu Yerucham 22/2; Rosh; Poskim brought in Nitei Gavriel 56 footnote 20; Yabia Omer E.H. 4/8

Other opinions: Some Poskim rule the Chasan is forbidden in getting a haircut or laundry during Sheva Brachos. [Bach Y.D. 342, brought in Shach ibid; Maharibil 3/72 according to Raavad; Kerem Shlomo 64, brought in Pischei Teshuvah 64/1] The Shach ibid strongly negates his opinion, as it argues against all the above Rishonim and Poskim. See Nitei Gavrile ibid footnote 21

[10] The reason: As a king needs to look beautiful, and have a nicely trimmed haircut and laundered and ironed clothing. [Shach ibid; Taz ibid]

[11] Nitei Gavriel 56/3 footnote 4 in name of Meiri Kesubos; Rashal Kesubos 12 and other Poskim

[12] Yifei Lalev 64/5; Meishiv Halacha 2/66; Sheol Umeishiv Mahdurah 5/91See Rashi Kesubos 47a

[13] Nitei Gavriel ibid in name of Maharsham 3/206k

[14] Nitei Gavriel 56/4

[15] Beis David Y.D. 177; Chaim Veshalom 2/27; Ben Ish Chaiy Shoftim 16; Kinyan Torah 3/32

[16] Daas Kedoshim 342/1; Dovev Meisharim 3/47; Chazon Ish E.H. 64/7; See Minchas Elazar 2/57

[17] Nitei Gavriel 56/5-6

[18] Levushei Mordechai E.H. Tinyana 56

[19] Chida in Shiyurei Bracha 64/1; Chaim Sheol 2/38; Chaim Falagi in Chaim Veshalom 2/57

[20] Sheilas Yaavetz 2/185

[21] Nite Gavriel 56 footnote 12

[22] See Nitei Gavriel 56/7; Mishneh Halachos 9/223; Tzitz Eliezer 11/85

[23] Zekan Aaron 215; Perach Mateh Ahron 2/65, brought in Pischei Teshuvah 64/1Chaim Sheol 2/38 Samech; Ben Ish Chaiy Shoftim 16; Aruch Hashulchan 64/3; Nitei Gavriel 64/8 footnote 17

[24] See Levushei Mordechai Tinayna 56; Nitei Gavriel 57/10

[25] The reason: As even on Yom Tov it is permitted to perform Melacha of Ochel Nefesh.

[26] Michaber Y.D. 342/1 regarding a haircut and certainly this would apply regarding nails; Nitei Gavriel 64/11

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