Saying Blessing on borrowed Tallis

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Is a Blessing recited over a borrowed Tallis? [1]

The Torah does not obligate one to tie Tzitzis to a garment that one does not own, such as a garment that does not belong to the person wearing it. Even Rabbinically, such a garment is exempt from Tzitzis for the first thirty days. These laws are explained in Chapter 3 Halacha 10. The following Halacha positioned here will relate to whether a blessing may be recited when wearing a borrowed Tallis. In the Poskim, this matter contains several opinions, with some Poskim saying a blessing may never be said and other Poskim saying it must always be said, and others mediating between different cases.[2] Due to this, some Gedolei Yisrael completely refrained from borrowing a Tallis from another.[3] The following arbitration is given by Admur regarding this dispute: Although a borrowed Tallis is Rabbinically exempt from Tzitzis for the first thirty days, nevertheless, even prior to the thirty day period, it is permitted to recite a blessing upon wearing such a Tallis. This blessing is not obligatory. If however the person is considered to legally own the Tallis then the blessing is obligatory. The following law will discuss the status of a borrowed Tallis, and when we considered the borrowed Tallis to be legally owned by the borrower, and hence require a blessing, and when it is not considered owned by him, and hence the blessing remains optional for the first thirty days.   

A. Borrowed with permission for the sake of the Mitzvah:[4]

One who borrows a Kosher Tallis Gadol or Katan[5] from his friend [after asking his permission] is obligated to recite a blessing upon wearing it if it was evident to his friend that he borrowed it for the sake of performing the Mitzvah of Tzitzis.[6] If this was not evident, then the blessing is optional [for the first thirty days[7]].[8] In normal circumstances, when borrowing a regular Tallis Gadol or Katan, we assume it is being lent for the sake of the borrower fulfilling the Mitzvah, and the blessing is hence obligatory.[9] [Nonetheless, practically when borrowing a Tallis from a friend [for the sake of the Mitzvah], the borrower is to explicitly ask the lender to give him the Tallis as a “Matana Al Menas Lehachzir”.[10] However in the event that this was not said, the law follows that which was stated above, that a blessing must be recited if it was borrowed for the Mitzvah.]

 

B. Borrowed with permission for the sake of Aliyah; Kerias Hatorah; Birchas Kohanim; Chazan:[11]

One who borrows a Tallis Gadol from his friend for the sake of [performing a communal service, such as] to perform the blessing of the Kohen on the Duchan, or to read the Torah, or to be the Chazan, then if the lender knows that the borrower [also] desires the Tallis in order to perform the Mitzvah of Tzitzis, then the borrower must say a blessing upon wearing it.[12] If however the lender does not know that the borrower desires the Tallis in order to perform the Mitzvah of Tzitzis, and rather assumes he is borrowing it to wear out of respect for the communal service, then the borrower is not obligated to say a blessing [within the first 30 days of the borrowing] although if he desires to do so, he may recite it.[13] [Practically, the custom is not to say a blessing when borrowing a Tallis for Kavod purposes.[14]]

C. Borrowed without knowledge of owner:[15]

When using the Tallis of another person without his permission[16] one is not required to recite a blessing prior to wearing it.[17] Nevertheless, if one desires to say a blessing over it, he may do so.[18] [See Chapter 1 Halacha 15 for the full details of borrowing a Tallis without permission]

 

D. Borrowed four cornered garment without Tzitzis:[19]

If one borrowed from a friend a four cornered garment that does not have Tzitzis, although it is not obligated in Tzitzis for the first thirty days of the borrowing period, nevertheless if one desires to tie Tzitzis to its corners within this time and wear it with a blessing, he may do so.[20] [If however the Tallis was borrowed with intent to wear for the Mitzvah, and the lender was informed of this intent, then the Tallis is immediately obligated in Tzitzis, and may not be worn until the Tzitzis are tied. For this reason, in today’s times that a Tallis is only borrowed for the sake of the Mitzvah, one may not wear a borrowed four cornered garment without Tzitzis even within 30 days.[21]]

 

Summary:

When borrowing a Tallis from another person for the sake of the Mitzvah it is proper for the borrower to ask the lender to give him the Tallis “Matana Al Menas Lehachzir”. If one did not do so, then if the owner knows the borrower desires the Tallis to perform the Mitzvah of Tzitzis, then the borrower must say a blessing upon wearing it. If however the borrower asked for the Tallis for Kavod purposes [such as to wear it upon being the Chazan] then it is optional for the borrower to say a blessing for the first 30 days.[22] When using the Tallis of another person without his knowledge, one is not obligated to say a blessing upon wearing it. In such a case the blessing is optional.

 

Q&A

Borrowing the Tallis of a Shul:[23]

The public Tallis of a Shul is considered jointly owned by all Jewry.[24] Thus, one who borrows the public Tallis of a Shul is obligated to say a blessing upon wearing it, just as is the law regarding one who wears a Tallis that he owns.[25] This applies even if he is borrowing it simply to wear out of Kavod/respect, such as to be Chazan or go to the Duchan and cases of the like, nevertheless a blessing must be recited prior to wearing it.[26] [Nevertheless, the widespread custom today is not to recite a blessing over a Shul’s Tallis that is worn simply for Kavod purposes.[27] See below in Q&A for a full analysis on this subject! Thus, if one desires to say a blessing and avoid all doubt, he should explicitly intend to fulfill the Mitzvah upon wearing the Shul’s Tallis for Kavod purposes and cover his head with the Tallis.[28] If one does not desire to recite a blessing when wearing the Tallis for Kavod purposes, he is to borrow another person’s Tallis rather than to use the Shul’s Tallis and consequently enter himself into an obligation to say the blessing.[29] Alternatively, he should give up his joint ownership of the Tallis prior to wearing it. Alternatively, the person who donates the Tallis to the Shul should stipulate beforehand that it is not considered owned  by the borrowers when they wear the Tallis for Kavod.[30]]

 

What is the status of a rented Tallis?

Some Poskim[31] rule it has the same status as a borrowed Tallis. Other Poskim[32] however leave this matter in question.

 

If one borrowed a Tallis without permission and damaged it, must he pay the owner for the damages?

Negligence:[33] If the Tallis was damaged due to negligence then the borrower is obligated to pay for the damages.

Process of wearing: If the Tallis was damaged in the process of using it, such as it tore, then if he borrowed it with permission he is exempt from damages.[34] This applies even if he borrowed it as a Matana Al Menas Lehachzir [although in such a case he does not fulfill the Mitzvah].[35] If however he borrowed it without permission then some Poskim[36] rule he is liable for all damages.[37] Others[38] however rule he is exempt from damages just like one who borrowed it with permission.

Not in process of wearing and no negligence: If he browed the Tallis without permission or with permission but not as a Matana Al Menas Lehachzir, then he is liable to pay for damages[39], although some Poskim[40] are lenient. If he borrowed the Tallis as a Matana Al Menas Lehachzir then he has the status of a Shomer Chinam[41] and is not liable unless it became damaged due to negligence.[42]

The Tallis became dirty:[43] If one borrowed the Tallis and it became dirty, one is required to wash it and return it to the owner in the same state as it was received.

 

Must one check and separate the Tzitzis of a borrowed Tallis prior to wearing it?

If one desires to recite a blessing over it, then the strings must be checked in all cases [if it was not yet checked that day by the owner]. If the Tallis was borrowed for the sake of performing the Mitzvah of Tzitzis, then it must be checked prior to wearing it in all cases. If however it was borrowed for Kavod purposes, such as to be Chazan, then one is not required to check it if he does not plan to recite a blessing over it. A Shul’s Tallis must be checked even if one is wearing it for Kavod purposes, and is not saying a blessing [although the widespread custom is to be lenient[44]].

 

Returning the borrowed Tallis to the owner:[45]

If the borrower did not return the Tallis:[46] If one borrowed a Tallis in a way that it was given to him as a present on condition to return [Matana Al Menas Lehachzir, as explained above] then if he does not return the Tallis to the owner he retroactively does not fulfill the Mitzvah.[47] This applies even if he was given the Tallis without having it said explicitly that it was a present on condition to return.[48]

By when must the Tallis be returned?[49] A borrowed Tallis [of Matana Al Menas Lehachzir] must be returned to the owner prior to the next day’s Shacharis prayer, [unless explicitly stated otherwise]. If one does not return it by then, it jeopardizes the validity of the Tallis’s ownership at the time it was used by the borrower.

How to return the Tallis to the owner:[50] [In a case that the Tallis was given as a Matana Al Menas Lehachzir] the receiver is to return the Tallis to the owner as a present with intent that the owner acquires it [as opposed to lending the Tallis back to the original owner].[51]

May the receiver give the Tallis to another to fulfill his obligation?[52] The receiver may give the Tallis to another person as a present on condition to return, and this person himself may also give it to another, as long as the original owner receives it in return, as originally stipulated.

If the Tallis became damaged does the borrower fulfill the Mitzvah?[53] If the Tallis was damaged in any way while it was in the possession of the borrower, even if one string tore off, then he does not fulfill the Mitzvah. According to most Poskim, this applies even if he pays the lender for the damages. The borrower must either purchase for him a new Tallis similar to the one borrowed, or ask the lender to forgive him for the damage and consider it as if he was paid.

 

Is a blessing recited when wearing a Tallis for the sake of Kavod?

  • One is wearing a Tallis for the sake of being a Chazan, or Baal Korei, or to give a Derasha or to go up to the Duchan. Must a blessing be recited if he owns the Tallis, such as if it is his Tallis or the Tallis of the Shul? May a blessing be recited if he borrowed the Tallis from a friend?

Yes, a blessing is to be recited even when wearing a Tallis for Kavod purposes.[54] Hence, if one owns the Tallis, or borrowed a Shul’s Tallis, he must recite a blessing prior to wearing it even if he is wearing it for Kavod purposes.[55] If he borrowed a Tallis from a friend for this purpose, the blessing is optional.[56] [However there is an opinion[57] that rules it is questionable whether a blessing is allowed to be recited when wearing a Tallis for Kavod purposes without intent to fulfill the Mitzvah.[58] This applies even if one owns the Tallis. According to all however one may/must recite a blessing if he explicitly has in mind to fulfill the Mitzvah of Tzitzis upon wearing it for Kavod, and also covers his head with the Tallis. Thus, if one desires to avoid all doubt, he should explicitly intend to fulfill the Mitzvah upon wearing the Tallis for Kavod purposes and cover his head with the Tallis.[59]]

 


[1] 14/4-8; Ketzos Hashulchan 7/9

[2] See footnotes below for the different opinions in each case

[3] Piskeiy Teshuvos 14/5 footnote 46

[4] 14/6; Based on [with differences]: Michaber 8/3; Rosh Chulin 8/26 [see however Rosh Tzitzis 2]; Taz 14/4-5; M”A 14/8

[5] 14/7 “Such as a Tallis Gadol or what is called Arba Kanfos”

[6] Admur ibid; Rosh Chulin 8/26; Michaber 14/3; M”A 14/8; Ben Ish Chaiy Lech Lecha 5; M”B 14/11; Kaf Hachaim 14/14; Piskeiy Teshuvos 14/5 that so is the practical custom

The reason: Although a borrowed Tallis is not obligated in Tzitzis for the first thirty days [14/4] and hence its blessing is merely optional [14/5] nevertheless when one borrows a Tallis that is only worn for the sake of the Mitzvah, such as a Tallis Gadol and Tallis Katan, he must recite a blessing. The reason for this is because we presume that the lender gave it to the borrower on the premises that he is borrowing it in order to fulfill the Mitzvah and say a blessing over it. Now, since it is not possible to recite a compulsory blessing on a borrowed Tallis, therefore it is circumstantial evidence that the lender intended to lend it in a way that the borrower can say a compulsory blessing. Now, since the blessing is not compulsory unless it belongs to the person wearing the Tallis therefore it is legally assumed that the lender gave the borrower the Tallis as a legal present on condition to return after its use, and it hence belongs to the borrower until it is returned. [Admur ibid; Taz ibid; M”A ibid; Rosh Chulin 8/26; Tur Even Haezer 28] 

Other opinions: Some Poskim rule that a borrowed Tallis is never to be used, and if one has to use it, one is not to say a blessing over it. [Rashal Kol Habasar 53 [brought in Taz]; Taz 14/5; Chesed Lealafim 14/3; Mor Uketzia] In the Siddur of Admur it is evident that there are opinions that rule that one may not say a blessing on a borrowed Tallis unless it was explicitly given as a Matana Al Menas Lehachzir. [See Siddur Raskin p. 67]

[7] 14/4

[8] 14/7

The reason: It is not considered a blessing in vain as although he is exempt from the Mitzvah he may nevertheless still recite “You commanded me to wear” just as women recite blessings over all the Mitzvos that they are exempt from, as explained in 17/3. [14/5; M”A 14/5]

Other opinions that obligate a blessing: Some Poskim rule a borrowed Kosher Tallis is always obligated in a blessing, even when borrowed not for the Sake of the Mitzvah, as the Torah only exempted a Tallis that was borrowed without Tzitzis tied to its corners. [Michaber 14/3; Rosh Tzitzis 2 [brought in M”A 14/8]; Baal Haitur; Shiveli Haleket Tzitzis in name of Rabbeinu Tam; Tur; Elya Zuta 14/7 in name of Rokeiach 361; Elya Raba 14/6 [brought in P”M 14 A”A 6]; Artzos Hachaim 14/3] The Poskim however negate this opinion and so is the final ruling. [Admur in Kuntrus Achron 14/3]

Other opinions that forbid blessing: Some Poskim rule that one may not say a blessing on a borrowed Tallis unless he actually owns it, as in their opinion a blessing may only be recited if one is obligated in the Mitzvah. [Mamar Mordechai 14/4 and Kaf Hachaim 14/14 according to Rambam and Michaber; Rashal ibid; Taz ibid; Chesed Lealafim 14/3; Mor Uketzia] In the Siddur of Admur it is evident that there are opinions that rule that one may not say a blessing on a borrowed Tallis unless it was explicitly given as a Matana Al Menas Lehachzir. [See Siddur Raskin p. 67]

[9] A four cornered garment that is worn for the sake clothing: The above ruling [of a compulsory blessing] is only regarding one who borrows a Tallis that is only worn for the sake of the Mitzvah, such as a Tallis Gadol and Tallis Katan, as in such a case the lender is certainly only acquiring it to him for the sake of him doing the Mitzvah and blessing, and it is thus considered a Matana Al Menas Lehachzir. If however one borrows a four cornered clothing garment that is not worn for the sake of the Mitzvah, but has Tzitzis tied to its corners due its obligatory status of four corners, then the borrowers is not obligated to recite a blessing being that we do not have any evidence that it was lent for the sake of the Mitzvah. Hence, we cannot assume that it was lent as a Matana Al Menas Lehachzir, as perhaps it was lent for the sake of wearing clothing. Nevertheless, if the borrower desires to say the blessing he may do so, as explained above in 14/4. [Admur 14/7; Taz 14/5; P”M 14 M”Z  4; Chayeh Adam 11/21; See however other opinions in previous footnotes]   

[10] Siddur Admur; Ketzos Hashulchan ibid; M”B 14/11

The reason: In order to be able to recite the blessing according to all opinions, as it is proper to avoid conflict when possible. [Siddur ibid] As the Rambam and others rule that a blessing may never be recited unless one is obligated in the Mitzvah, and there are Poskim that rule that even when borrowed for the sake of the Mitzvah it is not considered to be owned by the borrower unless it was explicitly given as a Matana Al Menas Lehachzir. [See other Poskim ibid; Kuntrus Acharon 14/3; Siddur Rav Raskin p. 67]

[11] 14/8 as explained in Kuntrus Acharon 14/3; Based on explanation of Rashal ibid; M”A 14/6; Taz 14/4; See Birchas Habayis 37/14

Other opinions who obligate a blessing: Some Poskim rule a borrowed Kosher Tallis is always obligated in a blessing even if one is borrowing it for the sake of Kavod. [Michaber 14/3; Rosh Tzitzis 2; Baal Haitur; Shiveli Haleket Tzitzis in name of Rabbeinu Tam; Tur; Elya Zuta 14/7 in name of Rokeiach 361; Elya Raba 14/6;] The Poskim however negate this opinions and so is the final ruling. [Admur in Kuntrus Achron 14/3] Other Poskim who forbid a blessing: Other Poskim rule that a Tallis borrowed for the sake of Kavod is never to receive a blessing even according to the Rosh. [Rashal Kol Habasar 53; Taz 14/5; Chesed Lealafim 14/3; Mor Uketzia; Ben Ish Chaiy Lech Lecha 5; Kaf Hachaim 14/14] In the Siddur of Admur it is evident that there are opinions that rule that one may not say a blessing on a borrowed Tallis unless it was explicitly given as a Matan Al Menas Lehachzir. [See Siddur Raskin p. 67]

[12] The reason: As since the lender knows that the borrower desires the Tallis in order to perform the Mitzvah of Tzitzis therefore he lent it to him for this purpose, for him to say a blessing over it, and it is hence considered as if the Tallis was given Matana Al Menas Lehachzir, and the Tallis is considered actually his. [ibid]

[13] The reason: As since the lender does not knows that the borrower desires the Tallis in order to perform the Mitzvah of Tzitzis therefore we cannot assume that he was given the Tallis Matana Al Menas Lehachzir. [ibid]

[14] Ben Ish Chaiy Lech Lecha 5; Kaf Hachaim 14/14; Birchas Habayis 37/14; Shaareiy Teshuvah 8/16; Piskeiy Teshuvos 14/5; See M”B 14/11 in name of Derech Hachaim that one is to borrow the Tallis with explicit intent to not acquire it, and then not say a blessing according to all.

[15] 14/11 based on Michaber 14/4 as explained in M”A 14/8; So also rules: Toras Chaim Sofer 14/10; Kaf Hachaim 14/20; Az Nidbaru 6/44

Other opinions: Some Poskim rule one may not recite a blessing over a borrowed Tallis unless it was explicitly given to him as a Matana Al Menas Lehachzir by the owner. [Rashal Kol Habasar 53; Taz 14/5; See Reb Akiva Eiger ibid; M”B 14/11] Others however rule that when one borrows the Tallis it is always considered a Matana Al Menas Lehachzir, and hence a blessing must be recited. [See Shach Choshen Mishpat 358/1; Birchas Habayis 37/23; other Poskim in previous footnotes] Some conclude based on this, that one is to borrow the Tallis with explicit intent to not acquire it, and then not say a blessing according to all. [M”B 14/14 based on Derech Hachaim]

[16] As explained in chapter 1 Halacha 15, see there for laws and regulations regarding borrowing a Tallis without permission

[17] The reason: As the owner is not aware that one has borrowed the Tallis and hence it is not relevant to say that it is considered as if the owner has given it to him as a present on condition to return [in which case a blessing is required]. [Admur ibid; M”A ibid; see other opinions stated above]

[18] The reason: As although he is not obligated in the Mitzvah, being the Tallis is not his, nevertheless this is no less than the ability of women to say a blessing over a Tallis, despite them not being obligated in the Mitzvah. [Admur 14/5; M”A 14/8]

[19] 14/5; M”A 14/5; Rosh Chulin 8/26 says it is best not to recite the blessing although one who does so has not lost out and so rules Semag and Semak, brought in Beis Yosef

Other opinions: Some Poskim rule a blessing may not be recited on a Tallis that was borrowed without Tzitzis, even if he ties Tzitzis onto it, until 30 days have passed. [Mamar Mordechai 14/4 and Kaf Hachaim 14/14 explain that according to the Rambam and Michaber that rule women may not say a blessing on Mitzvos that they are not obligated in, so too here one may not say a blessing; Rashal ibid; Taz ibid; Chesed Lealafim 14/3; Mor Uketzia; See Siddur Admur and Rav Raskin p. 67]

[20] The reason: It is not considered a blessing in vain as although he is exempt from the Mitzvah he may nevertheless still recite “You commanded me to wear” just as women recite blessings over all the Mitzvos that they are exempt from, as explained in 17/3. [Admur ibid; M”A 14/5]

[21] Aruch Hashulchan 14/9; Piskeiy Teshuvos 14/5 footnote 30

[22] This applies unless one knows that the lender gave it to him for the sake of the Mitzvah.

[23] Elya Raba 14/6 in name of Mordechai 950; P”M 14 A”A 6; M”B 14/7; Birchas Habayis 37/18; Chesed Lealafim 14/6; Derech Hachaim 9; Kitzur SHU”A 9/11; Mateh Efraim 581/14; Aruch Hashulchan 14/10; Toras Chaim Sofer 14/14; Ketzos Hashulchan 7/9; Ben Ish Chaiy Lech Lecha 5; Kaf Hachaim 14/15

[24] The reason: As the congregation purchased the public Tallis for the sake that it be considered the property of each Jew when he wears it. [M”B ibid]

[25] The reason: As the Tallis of a Shul is considered owned by all Jewry, and hence is obligated in Tzitzis by any Jew who wears it, as he owns a part in the Tallis, and it thus similar to a Tallis of joint ownership. [M”B ibid] Thus, a blessing must be recited even if one has intent not to acquire it, as the Tallis is already his. [Har Tzevi 1/17]

[26] All Poskim ibid

[27] So is the widespread custom as can be witnessed, and so writes: Halichos Shlomo 3/12; Mishneh Halachos 9/234; Piskeiy Teshuvos 14/7

The reason: As some Poskim rule one may not recite a blessing when wearing a Tallis for Kavod purposes, as he is not wearing it for the sake of the Mitzvah. [ibid]

[28] Shaareiy Efraim and Biur Halacha ibid; Koveitz Mibeis Levi 6/58; Piskeiy Teshuvos 14/8

[29] Shaareiy Efraim 10/11; Biur Halacha 14/3 “Sheila”; Pashut, as all the Poskim ibid require a blessing to be said on the Shul’s Tallis and hence one should avoid the situation if possible.

[30] See Piskeiy Teshuvos 14/7

[31] Olas Tamid 14/6; Elya Raba 145; Kaf Hachaim 14/15; M”B 14/10; Chasam Sofer Shaar Hagedilin 20/2

[32] Ittur Tzitzis 2/1 brought in M”B ibid and Chasan Sofer ibid; See there in Chasan Sofer that according to the Hagahos Ashriy a rented Tallis is obligated in Tzitzis.

[33] Choshen Mishpat 291/1 [regarding a Shomer Chinam, and certainly this would apply to a borrower in this case even if one holds according to the Machaneh Efraim]

[34] Birkeiy Yosef 586/10; Halachos Ketanos 1/79; Shulchan Gavoa 586/8; Kaf Hachaim 586/25

The reason: As a borrower [Shoel] is only liable for all damages if the damages did not occur in the process of the normal use of the object. [Choshen Mishpat 340/1]

[35] See M”B 658/15; Michaber Choshen Mishpat 341/8 and Smeh 241/21 that he has the status of a Shomer Chinam; See Piskeiy Teshuvos 14 footnote 41

[36] Birkeiy Yosef 586/10 in name of Mahriy Malko 98; Shaareiy Teshuvah 586/2 [4]; See Kaf Hachaim 14/18 and 586/25

[37] As this has a status of “Shoel Shelo Midaas” in which case he is liable in all cases.

[38] Halachos Ketanos 1/79; Shulchan Gavoa 586/8; Beir Heiytiv 586/4; Sdei Chemed Daled Minim 9

[39] Orin Telisain 97 based on M”A 586/6 as he has a status of a borrower which is liable for even Onsin. [Choshen Mishpat 340/1]; See Sdei Chemed ibid; Piskeiy Teshuvos ibid footnote 9

[40] Machaneh Efraim Nedarim 24 as the borrower receives no monetary benefit from the use of the Tallis and he thus does not have the status of a borrower in this regard.

[41] Michaber Choshen Mishpat 341/8 and Smeh 241/21

[42] Michaber 291/1

[43] Alef Lecha Shlomo 8

[44] Piskeiy Teshuvos 14/7

[45] See M”B 14/12; Michaber 658/5 regarding Daled Minim

[46] See M”B 14/12; Michaber 658/5 regarding Kesuscha

[47] The reason: As the Tallis cannot be considered “Kesuscha”. [M”B ibid]

[48] The reason: As we assume one desires to have the item returned and is not giving it to them for keeps. [M”B 658/18]

[49] M”B 14/12 unlike Nesiv Hachaim

[50] M”B 14/12; Michaber 658/5

[51] Nevertheless, Bedieved even if the borrower did not say this, it is still considered to have returned to the legal ownership of the lender. [Shaar Hatziyon 658/25]

[52] Michaber 658/5 regarding Daled Minim

Other Opinions: There are Poskim which are stringent to not allow the receiver to give the Daled Minim to another unless he received explicit permission. [See M”B 658/21; Biur Halacha “Umihu”]

[53] M”B 14/12; and 658/15; See Michaber 658/4

[54] Clear implication of Admur 14/8; 18/3; 18/7; Rama 18/1; M”A 14/6 in name of Rosh; Taz 581/2; All Poskim in next footnote

Background of opinion of Admur and Poskim ibid:

Halacha 18/3 and 14/3 implies that one does make a blessing even when wearing a Tallis for Kavod, as otherwise why in 18/3 is a blessing made on the Tallis Erev Yom Kippur, and why in 14/3 does Admur depend whether the blessing is made when borrowing  a Tallis for Kavod on whether the giver had full intent to give it as  a present or not. Either way a blessing should not be made since it’s for Kavod? Hence it is implied that even by Kavod a blessing is made.

[55] Elya Raba 14/6 in name of Mordechai 950; P”M 14 A”A 6; M”B 14/7 and 581/6; Birchas Habayis 37/18; Chesed Lealafim 14/6; Derech Hachaim 9; Kitzur SHU”A 9/11; Mateh Efraim 581/14; Aruch Hashulchan 14/10; Toras Chaim Sofer 14/14; Ketzos Hashulchan 7/9; Ben Ish Chaiy Lech Lecha 5; Kaf Hachaim 14/15

[56] Admur 14/8

[57] Shaareiy Efraim 10/11; Biur Halacha 14/3 “Sheila”; brought in Ketzos Hashulchan 7 footnote 28; Shoel Umeishiv, brought in Piskeiy Teshuvos 14/8 footnote 60; See also Igros Kodesh 19/249 [printed in Shulchan Menachem 1/63] that the Rebbe mentions the dispute in whether a blessing is made when the Chazan wears a Tallis for Davening.

Opinion of Beir Heiytiv: The Beir Heiytiv 18/4 writes in the name of the Lechem Chamudos Tzitzis 1/3 that one is not to say a blessing when wearing a  Tallis for Kavod. The Biur Halacha ibid learns from here that he is also of the opinion that a blessing may not be recited for Kavod purposes, as rules the Shaareiy Efraim. However the Ketzos Hashulchan 7 footnote 28 negates this explanation of the Beir Heiytiv by the Biur Halacha ibid, as in truth the Lechem Chamudos is referring to a Chazan who is wearing the Tallis after Maariv, and that is why a blessing is not recited.

[58] The reason: As perhaps wearing it temporarily for a few mere moments for Kavod is not considered a real “wearing” which the Torah obligates in Tzitzis. [Shaar Efraim ibid] Alternatively, the reason is because Mitzvos need Kavana and when one wears the Tallis for Kavod purposes the Kavana is lacking. [Biur Halacha ibid]

[59] Shaareiy Efraim and Biur Halacha ibid; Koveitz Mibeis Levi 6/58; Piskeiy Teshuvos 14/8

 

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