Fire on Shabbos

The law if the fire poses a danger:[1]

It is permitted and praiseworthy to extinguish any fire which has even a remote doubt[2] as to if it can be life threatening. Thus any fire which has the ability to reach people who will be unable to escape from it, such as old and sick people as well as children, then one is to extinguish the fire on Shabbos. [Hence practically today, fires which occur in homes, offices and the like may be extinguished due to fear they may spread to a home that contains people which will be unable to escape. In such cases one may phone the fire department and do all that he can to extinguish the fire. Thus only if the house is sitting alone in a large plane of land, and hence there is no suspicion of the fire spreading to others, does it remain forbidden to extinguish the fire, if all the inhabitants are able to escape the house.[3]]

No need for atonement:[4] Anyone which extinguished a fire which posed a possible danger does not need atonement, and is not allowed to be stringent on himself and do acts of repentance on it even if he so wishes.[5]

Practically what is one to do if there is a small fire in one’s home such as Shabbos candles?

Seemingly it is best to try to first extinguish the fire in indirect ways, such as by placing bags of water around it. If this is not possible and there is fear the fire may spread, then one is to spill water around the fire. If this too does not help one may extinguish the fire directly.

 

Extinguishing a fire which merely poses a safety hazard:[6]

It is permitted to extinguish a fiery metal coal if it is found in an area which poses a public safety hazard, even if it is not life threatening.[7] Furthermore, even by a wood coal it is permitted for one to be lenient to extinguished it if it poses a public safety hazard, even if it is not life threatening.[8] Nevertheless every Baal Nefesh should be stringent and avoid extinguishing wood coals even if they pose a safety hazard, so long as they are not life threatening.[9]

 

Summary:

It is permitted to extinguish any fire that poses a safety hazard even if it is not life threatening. Nevertheless one who is meticulous should be stringent against doing so.

 

Preventing a non-lethal fire from spreading:[10]

Spreading non-flammable material onto the area near the fire: If a vessel has caught fire it is permitted for one to spread a non-flammable material, such as non-Muktzah goatskin, near the fire, over the untouched area, in order to prevent the fire from spreading.[11]

Placing jugs of water near the fire: One may surround the fire with vessels filled with water, hence having the fire break through the vessel, causing the water to spill, extinguishing the fire.[12] [It is however forbidden to spill water around the fire, having it extinguish when it reaches the water.[13]]

Pouring liquid on a cloth:[14] If a cloth has caught fire, it is permitted to pour colored liquids, such as red wine, onto the cloth a short distance from the fire, in order for it to extinguish the fire when it reaches the water.[15]  It is however forbidden to pour water or white/clear colored liquids onto the cloth due to the whitening prohibition.[16]

Shaking a cloth that has caught fire:[17] It is forbidden to shake a cloth that has caught fire in order to extinguish it. One however may use the cloth for its intended purposes, and if doing so causes the fire to extinguish, so be it.

Placing a vessel of water under a candle to catch the falling sparks:[18] It is forbidden to place a vessel of liquid under a flame in order to catch falling sparks.[19] Furthermore even before Shabbos it is forbidden to set up this vessel with liquid to catch the falling sparks on Shabbos.[20]

 

Q&A

May one shake on to the floor a lit match or candle which has fallen onto one’s tablecloth?[21]

Yes.

 

May one extinguish a spark?

No.[22] However some Poskim[23] rule this is allowed in a case of great loss.[24]

Asking a gentile to extinguish a non-lethal fire:[25]

Asking a gentile to extinguish a fire from within one’s own home: It is forbidden to ask a gentile to extinguish a fire in one’s home [that does not pose any bodily danger[26]] even if not doing so will cause one great loss.[27] It is however permitted to ask a gentile to extinguish a fire in order to save Sefarim from being burnt if there is no other way for them to be saved. [Based on this if one’s Mezuzas are hammered into the door post one may always ask a gentile to extinguish a fire in order to save the Mezuzos from getting burned.[28]] Furthermore, although one may not ask a gentile to extinguish the fire, as explained above, one may however announce that whoever extinguishes the fire will not lose out [compensation]. One may even call a gentile to come with him to the area of the fire and then make this announcement.[29]

If the gentile decided to extinguish the fire on his own:[30] If a gentile has come to extinguish the fire on his own accord, there is no need to protest his actions.[31]

May one tell a gentile to extinguish a fire from within another person’s home? [32] It is permitted to ask a gentile to extinguish a fire within a gentile’s home even in order to prevent the fire from reaching one’s own home. [Furthermore, if one is doing so to prevent the fire from reaching his own home, then it is allowed even if the fire is in another Jews home.[33] Furthermore, even if there is no worry of damage to one’s own belongings some Poskim[34] rule one may nevertheless ask a gentile to extinguish the fire in another Jews home.[35] Vetzaruch Iyun.[36]]

 

A child which has come to extinguish the fire, must he be protested?[37]

One must protest against a child which has come to extinguish a fire, as certainly he is doing so or the benefit of the adult owner and not for his own benefit.

 

Extinguishing a metal coal:[38]

It is Rabbinically[39] forbidden to extinguish a metal coal which does not pose danger for the public.

 

What may one save from a fire in one’s home in a case that the fire does not pose a danger?[40]

A. The general rules:

The Sages decreed that one is forbidden from saving anything from a fire[41] which is in his house [or building or courtyard[42]] with exception to the amount of food he needs for the remaining meals of Shabbos, clothing and Sefarim as will be explained.

Saving items into one’s own courtyard ,neighbors house, other room in same house:[43] It is disputed whether the above restriction of the Sages apply in all cases, even if one desires to save the objects into his own private courtyard, or only when he desires to save them into a courtyard which is jointly owned[44]. [However according to all it is permitted to save the items from one room to another.[45]] Practically one is to be stringent [to save the items into another room rather than to outside his house. If however this is not possible, one may be lenient to save all his items into his own courtyard or into a next door neighbor’s home with which there is an established Eiruv[46].[47]]

Asking a gentile to save items from a fire:[48] It is forbidden to ask a gentile to save one’s items from the fire if those items are forbidden for the Jew himself to save. [49] Thus only those items to be mentioned that may be saved by a Jew, may be saved through a gentile. Nevertheless, although one may not ask a gentile to save items from the fire, as explained above, one may however announce that whoever saves items from the fire will not lose out. One may even call a gentile to come with him to the area of the fire and then make this announcement.[50]

If the gentile decided to save items from the fire on his own:[51] If a gentile has come to save one’s belongings from the fire on his own accord, there is no need to protest his actions.[52]

 

B. Saving food:

It is permitted for one to save the amount of food he needs for the remaining meals of Shabbos. Hence if the fire occurred Friday night prior to the meal one may save three meals worth of food. If the fire occurred Shabbos day before the meal one may save two meals worth. If the fire occurred Shabbos afternoon before Mincha he may save one meals worth. One may save enough food for the remainder of Shabbos for oneself, and animals. The above allowance applies even if one has food to eat elsewhere.[53]

Taking out in a single vessel:[54] It was only prohibited to take out more than one’s need for his remaining meals if one will be making more than one trip to and from the house. One may however take out as much food as he can fit into a single vessel in a single trip, even if the vessel will contain a lot more than three meals worth. Hence one may spread his Tallis and pile into it as much food as he can fit. [This allowance applies each time one returns to the house to take out items that he is permitted to remove. This allowance however is limited only to items that are needed for the meal. It is however forbidden to take out items not needed for the meal even in a single vessel.[55]]

Saving for household members:[56] All household members must save for themselves and may not have others save for them. One may however save for the sick, weak and old.

How much food may one save per meal:[57] Through using Harama[58] one may save as many types of dishes and foods as he desires. For example if one took enough meat for the remaining meals, he may now return and take fish for the remaining meals, saying that he currently enjoys fish more. The same applies with regards to different types of breads. It is however forbidden for one to save more than one dish per meal without using this method of Harama.[59]

May one save vessels needed for the meal?[60] One may save all the utensils that will be needed for the remaining meals. [However one may not save many vessels within one vessel, or do Harama, as is permitted by food.[61]]

May other people save items from one’s fire?[62] It is forbidden for neighbors and friends to save any item from another person’s fire, on behalf of that person.[63] However the neighbors and friends may save for themselves enough food for their own remaining meals, if the owner asked them to do so. If they were not asked to do so then they may not save anything from the fire. In all cases it is forbidden for others to save items not needed for their remaining meals.

May one carry the saved items outside if there is no Eiruv?[64] It is forbidden for one to carry the items into an area that does not have an Eiruv. This prohibition includes even saving them to another courtyard that is lacking Eiruv Chatzeiros.

Saving a box which contains food:[65] If food (or a ring) is inside of a vessel which contains valuables, it is forbidden to save the entire vessel together with the food (or ring).[66] Nevertheless in a case of great loss it is permitted to place any item which may be saved on top of any other item, and then save them to another courtyard which has an Eiruv even if they contain Muktzah items. Thus in a case of great loss one may place bread on top of his wallet and then carry out the wallet together with the bread on top of it.

 

Q&A

May one save Lechem Mishneh for each meal?[67]

Yes.

 

May one save foods for desert? [68]

Yes. One may take out one dish for desert unless he uses Harama in which cases he may take out as many dishes as he wishes for that meal, using this method.

 

How much liquid may one save?[69]

One may save as much liquid as one will need throughout the remainder of Shabbos.

 

C. Saving clothing:[70]

One may save as many pairs of clothing as he wishes by wearing them. One may make many trips back and forth and even ask others to do the same. One may wear various clothing on top of each other even into an area without an Eiruv. [Those clothing which one needs to wear that day one may save in hands, without wearing them.[71]]

D. Saving Sefarim:[72]

Today all Torah Sefarim may be saved from a fire, irrelevant of what language they are written in.[73] It is even permitted to ask a gentile to extinguish a fire in order to save Sefarim from being burnt if there is no other way for them to be saved.[74] [Based on this if one’s Mezuzas are hammered into the door post one may always ask a gentile to extinguish a fire in order to save the Mezuzos from getting burned.[75]]

Saving a Pasul Sefer Torah:[76] One may save a Pasul Sefer Torah so long as it has intact enough complete words which in total account to 85 letters, or contains Hashem’s name. The same law applies to single pages of a Sefer Torah that they may only be saved if they contain the above mentioned amount of words or G-d’s name.[77]
Saving above items to area without an Eiruv:[78] It is forbidden to save Sefarim, or even a Sefer Torah to an area without an Eiruv. If however it has an Eiruv and is merely lacking Eiruv Chatzeiros or Muvaos then it is allowed. Some opinions allow asking a gentile to save Sefarim even to a Reshus Harabim.[79]

Saving a box which contains books: [80]  If Sefarim, Tefillin, Mezuzas are inside of a vessel, it is permitted to save the entire vessel together with them, even they contain Muktzah items. Nevertheless it is forbidden on Shabbos to initially place those items in the vessel in order to be allowed to do so in case of a fire.

Summary list of items that may be saved:

  • One may save all items [including expensive Muktzah] from one room to another, or even from inside to his back or front yard.
  • Foods, liquid and vessels for the remaining meals may be saved. Unlimited amount of foods may be saved in a single vessel.
  • Valuables: All valuables that have great loss, even if Muktzah, may be saved by placing needed meal foods on them
  • Clothing: All clothing needed for that day may be taken in hand and all other clothing may be worn, even in many trips.
  • Sefarim: All Sefarim may be saved.

 

Q&A

May one remove a Mezuzah from a door to save it from a fire?[81]

No.[82] One may however ask a gentile to extinguish the fire to prevent them from getting burned. Based on this if one’s Mezuzas are hammered into the door post one may always ask a gentile to extinguish a fire in order to save the Mezuzos from getting burned.[83]

May one save his items from an approaching fire that is in his neighbor’s home?[84]

If the fire is in a neighbor’s home [that is not within the same building or courtyard[85]], there is no limit given in terms of items that one may save from the potential fire that may spread into his home.[86]

May one save Muktzah objects? It is permitted for one to save from a neighbor’s oncoming fire[87] valuable Muktzah items[88]. [Nevertheless it is best to place on the Muktzah items a non-Muktzah object and then carry them together.[89]] It is forbidden according to all to move Muktzah items which are not of much value.[90]

May one carry the items outside if there is no Eiruv? It is forbidden for one to carry the items into a Karmalis.[91] Hence one may only save the items into an area that has an Eiruv.

 

Saving items from robbers: [92]

If robbers are coming to search and rob from one’s home, it is permitted for one to move valuable Muktzah items[93], in order to save them from the robbers. It is forbidden according to all to move Muktzah items which are not of much value.[94]

May one carry the items outside if there is no Eiruv? It is forbidden for one to carry the items into a Karmalis.[95] Hence one may only save the items into an area that has an Eiruv.

 

 Atonement for desecrating Shabbos for sake of saving belongings:[96]

If one transgressed and extinguished a fire in a case that doing so posed no safety hazard then he is in need of atonement. This is accomplished through fasting a certain set of fasts and donating a certain amount of money to charity.

 

General summary:

  1. One may extinguish a fire in any of the following cases:
    • It poses danger to anyone’s life, or can potentially pose danger if not extinguished. Practically today that we live in populated areas with houses very close to each other, it is almost always allowed to extinguish a fire in such cases. In such a case one may extinguish the fire and do any Melacha necessary to have the fire put out.
    • The fire does not pose any danger of life but can cause injury. In such a case one may extinguish a fire but may not do any other Biblical Melacha. 
  2. One may ask a gentile to extinguish a fire in any of the following cases:
  • Poses bodily danger or injury.
  • The fire is in someone else’s home [although not within one’s building].
  • There are Sefarim that need to be saved and cannot be saved in another way.
  • There are Mezuzas attached to the doors and cannot be taken down without transgressing the destroying prohibition.

 


[1] 329/1

[2] 329/3

[3] SSH”K 41/1

[4] 334/28

[5] As this can cause himself [or others] to be lax in extinguishing a fire the next time it occurs. [ibid]

[6] 334/29

[7] As extinguishing a metal coal is merely Rabinically forbidden, and in a case of a public safety hazard the Sages did not uphold their decree. [ibid]

[8] As according to the opinions which rules a Melacha which is not needed Legufa is not Biblically forbidden, then extinguishing this coal is only a Rabbinical prohibition, and is thus permitted to be done in a case of safety hazard. The reason for this is because the Sages did not uphold their Rabbinical decrees in a case of public safety hazard despite the fact that they uphold it even in a case of money loss. Now although there is a dissenting opinion that rules a Melacha which is not needed Legufa is nevertheless Biblically forbidden, and hence extinguishing this coal is a Biblical prohibition, nevertheless the main ruling is like the lenient opinions. [ibid]

[9] As according to the opinion which rules a Melacha which is not needed Legufa is nevertheless Biblically forbidden, then extinguishing this coal is a Biblical prohibition, and is only permitted in a life threatening scenario. Now although we rule like the dissenting opinion that it is not Biblical, nevertheless a meticulous person is to be stringent. [ibid]

To note that in 316/22 in which a similar dispute is brought Admur there concludes that a Baal Nefesh should only be meticulous if he is able to avoid the danger and is able to warn others to avoid it. Vetzaruch Iyun why a similar conclusion was not brought here. Perhaps one can explain that there it is more difficult to avoid the danger as the damaging creature moves, however here with a  coal it does not move and can be easily avoided. However Tzaruch Iyun nevertheless why this law was placed in parentheses.

[10] 334/22

[11] Goatskin prevents fire from spreading as it itself becomes scorched but does not catch fire and it hence protects the object under it. [ibid]

[12] The Sages did not decree against causing the fire to extinguish in this manner in a case of loss, as in truth it is only a grama, indirect, form of extinguishing, as it is the fire itself which causes the vessels to break and the water to spill. [ibid]

[13] As this is not considered indirect [grama] as in the previous case when there was an interval between the fire and the water, and it was the fire that destroyed the interval. [ibid and 265/8]

[14] 334/23

[15] Now although in this case there is no interval between the fire and the water, and thus should be forbidden as explained in the previous case, nevertheless since it does not actually extinguish the fire but simply prevents it from spreading on the wet area, hence causing the fire to extinguish on its own, therefore it is allowed. [ibid]

[16] As soaking a cloth constitutes laundering it. Alternatively it is due to a decree one may come to squeeze the water from it. [ibid]

[17] 334/24

[18] 265/8

[19] As the liquid hastens the extinguishing of the sparks and by doing so this is considered as if one is directly extinguishing the flame. Even by an actual fire the Sages only permitted placing liquid in a vessel and having the fire break through the vessel, as the vessel separates between the fire and the water, hence considered the person’s action an indirect cause.  Alternatively they allowed wetting the other side of a cloth hence preventing the fire from spreading. However to pour water in the path of the fire is not considered indirect and is forbidden. [ibid]

[20] Now, although all actions are permitted to be done before Shabbos, despite this causing a Melacha to occur on Shabbos, nevertheless in this case the Sages were stringent as not all know of the prohibition in hastening the extinguishing of a spark and if it were to be allowed to be done before Shabbos people may come to do so on Shabbos. [ibid]

[21] Ashel Avraham Mahadurah Tinyana 23

[22] As is evident from above 265/8

[23] Bashamayim Eish 194

[24] As they claim a spark has no real tangibility and hence in a case of great loss is allowed. No inference can be brought from Admur ibid that doing so is forbidden in a case of great loss, as Admur is discussing a case that the fire would in any event definitely extinguish in the vessel, and one simply desires to hasten it, in which he rules it is forbidden.

[25] 334/25

[26] If however it poses bodily danger, even if it is not lethal, nevertheless even a  Jew himself may extinguish the fire as explained above.

[27] Although all Rabbinical prohibitions may be done through a gentile in a case of great loss, and hence here too extinguishing [which is merely Rabbinical according to those which say one is exempt from a Melacha done not Legufa] should be allowed according to those opinions that it is Rabbinical, nevertheless it was prohibited by the Sages, lest one come due to panic to extinguish the fire himself. Meaning, that since such a person is naturally in a state of panic and is unable to think clear, if we allow him to save his valuables in any way he may come to do so himself. [ibid]

[28] Misgeres Hashulchan 85/2

[29] 334/27

[30] 334/26

[31] As when a gentile does so, he has certainly calculated the benefits he will receive from his actions either now or later, and thus he intends on doing so for his own benefit. [ibid]

[32] 307/35

[33] As it is Amirah Lenachri in a case of great loss, and the Jew is not panicky that we should decree against him doing so. Nevertheless Tzaruch Iyun from 307/35 where Admur only mentions an allowance to ask a gentile to extinguish his own fire, or another gentiles fire, and does not mention the fire of a Jew.

[34] Rav SZ”A in SSH”K, brought in Piskeiy Teshuvos 334/6.

[35] As the entire reason it is forbidden for one to tell a gentile to extinguish his own fire is because one is panicky and if we were to allow him to so he may come to extinguish the fire himself. This reason however does not apply to another person, which his belongings are not in jeopardy.

[36] As why should Amirah Lenachri be allowed to this person if he has no great personal need for it to be done. This is besides for the fact that according to some extinguishing a fire is Biblically forbidden [as Melacha Sheiyno Tzarich Legufa is Chayav], and hence it is not allowed even in a case of loss.

[37] 334/26

[38] 334/29

[39] There is no Biblical prohibition involved in extinguishing a metal coal being that it does not burn. It is however Rabbinically forbidden to extinguish it. [ibid]

[40] 334/1

[41] This includes food, drink, and all items even if they are not Muktzah and there is an Eiruv in the city, or even if one desires to bring the items to another room away from the fire. [ibid]

The reason for this decree is because they suspected that if one were to be allowed to save all of one’s belongings he may come, due to the panic and hastiness of saving the items, to forget that it is Shabbos and extinguish the fire. [ibid]

[42] Aruch Hashulchan 334/17; Kaf Hachayim 334/6

[43] 334/11

[44] Thus to save them to a next door neighbors house if an eiruv is established between the two houses, or to save the items into one’s own courtyard some hold is permitted. [ibid]

[45] Ketzos Hashulchan 141/8 in name of M”B

[46] What does this mean? Is there space between the two houses? Wouldn’t this mean that he is taking it to a joint courtyard which is forbidden to all?

[47] Ketzos Hashulchan 141 footnote 13. M”B rules one may be lenient in a Rabbinical dispute.

[48] 334/25

[49] Although all Rabbinical prohibitions may be done through a gentile in a case of great loss, and hence here too saving the objects through a gentile should be allowed, nevertheless it was prohibited by the Sages, lest one come due to panic to extinguish the fire himself. Meaning, that since such a person is naturally in a state of panic and is unable to think clear, if we allow him to save his valuables in any way he may come to do so himself. [ibid]

[50] 334/27

[51] Based on 334/26 regarding him coming to extinguish the fire.

[52] As when a gentile does so, he has certainly calculated the benefits he will receive from his actions  either now or later, and thus he intends on doing so for his own benefit. [ibid]

[53] 334/3

[54] 334/6

[55] Ketzos Hashulchan 141 footnote 5

[56] So is implied from 334/4-5

[57] 334/3

[58] Trickery as will be explained next

[59] So is implied from Admur ibid and so rules Ketzos Hashulchan 141 footnote 2, nevertheless he concludes that the reason behind this matter requires further analysis, as in truth one should be able to save as many dishes as he feels he will eat during the meal.

[60] 334/8

[61] Ketzos Hashulchan 141 footnote 7

[62] 334/7

[63] As although they are not in a state of panic and hence there is no worry that they will come to extinguish the fire, nevertheless it is forbidden as the Sages did not differentiate in their decree. [ibid]

Other Opinions: The Chayeh Adam, brought in M”B rules they may save for the owner any item in the house, including money. Clearly this is not the opinion of Admur as is evident from 334/7. According to all it is forbidden for others to save items for themselves that are not needed for their remaining meals. [Ketzos Hashulchan 141 footnote 8]

[64] 334/9

[65] 334/18

[66] As the food or ring are nullified to the valuables.

[67] Ketzos Hashulchan 141 footnote 2 in name of Biur Halacha

[68] Ketzos Hashulchan 141 footnote 2

[69] Ketzos Hashulchan 141 footnote 2 in name of Biur Halacha

[70] 334/9

[71] Ketzos Hashulchan 141 footnote 9

[72] 334/12-13

[73] The concept of a Sefer written in a language that one’s country does not understand no longer applies today as with mail or countries can receive the products of other countries and if it can’t be read in this country it can be read in the next country. Thus all books written in languages spoken today have holiness and may be saved irrelevant of where they are written [Ketzos Hashulchan 141 footnote 18]

[74] 334/25

[75] Misgeres Hashulchan 85/2

[76] 334/15

[77] 334/20

[78] 334/17

[79] 334/19

[80] 334/18

[81] Misgeres Hashulchan 85/2

[82] This is forbidden to be done due to the destroying prohibition.

[83] Misgeres Hashulchan 85/2

[84] 334/2; 301/40

[85] Aruch Hashulchan 334/17; Kaf Hachayim 334/6

[86] As so long as the fire has not yet reached one’s home one is not in a state of panic to the point that he will forget it is Shabbos. [ibid]

[87] However if the fire is in one’s own home, it is forbidden for him to even food more than 3 meals worth, let alone Muktzah items. [ibid] Hence even according o the opinion that moving Muktzah was allowed in a case of great loss or in a case of fire, certainly they agree that when the fire is within one’s own home it is forbidden.

[88] As there are opinions which rule one may move Muktzah in a case of great loss. Furthermore, even according to those which rule Muktzah is forbidden to be moved even in a case of great loss, there are opinions which say in such a case moving Muktzah is allowed, as if it were to be forbidden, out of panic, one may come to transgress an even more severe sin, such as extinguishing the fire. Practically with the joint of these two opinions one may be lenient to move out his Muktzah items from the fire. [ibid]

[89] As in such a case there are those which allow doing so even in one’s own home fire. [Ketzos Hashulchan 141 footnote 15]

[90] As in such a case there is no great loss, and one is not panicky about it.

[91] There are opinions which rule that it is even permitted to carry into a Karmalis the items which one desires to save, as if we were to forbid this, they may come, due to panic, to transgress a more sever sin such as extinguishing the fire.  Nevertheless many Poskim argue on this opinion and practically one may not be lenient, and it is only by Muktzah that some Poskim also rule that Muktzah is permitted to be moved in a case of great loss, that we combine the opinions and allow one to be lenient. [ibid]

[92] 334/2; 301/40

[93] As there are opinions which rule one may move Muktzah in a case of great loss. Furthermore, even according to those which rule Muktzah is forbidden to be moved even in a case of great loss, there are opinions which say in such a case moving Muktzah is allowed, as if it were to be forbidden, out of panic, one may come to transgress an even more severe sin, such as extinguishing the fire. Practically with the joint of these two opinions one may be lenient to move out his Muktzah items from the fire. [ibid]

[94] As in such a case there is no great loss, and one is not panicky about it.

[95] There are opinions which rule that it is even permitted to carry into a Karmalis the items which one desires to save, as if we were to forbid this, they may come, due to panic, to transgress a more sever sin such as burying the money.  Nevertheless many Poskim argue on this opinion and practically one may not be lenient, and it is only by Muktzah that some Poskim also rule that Muktzah is permitted to be moved in a case of great loss, that we combine the opinions and allow one to be lenient. [ibid]

[96] 334/28

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