Counted wrong day

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Saying or having in mind the wrong day:

A. Said the wrong date and did not remember until the next night:

If one counted the wrong date and only discovered the next night, then it is considered that he did not count that day and he thus may no longer continue counting with a blessing.[1]  See Halacha 21!

B. Upon saying the blessing had in mind the wrong date and remembered right after the blessing:[2]

If upon saying the blessing one had in mind the wrong date, and then after completing the blessing he remembered the correct date, he is not required to repeat the blessing, and is to rather immediately count the correct date on the basis of the blessing that he already said.[3] Thus, if for example one said the blessing with intent to count the 4th day, thinking that today is the 4th day, and after completing the blessing he remembered that today is the 5th day, then he is to immediately count the 5th day.

C. Said the wrong date and remembered right away?[4]

Repeating the correct date:[5] If after the blessing one said the wrong date, he is required to repeat the correct date. This applies even if at the time of the blessing he had in mind to say the correct date. For example, if on the 4th day one said the blessing with intent to count the 4th day, and his tongue slipped and said the 5th day, then he must repeat and count the 4th day.[6]

Repeating the blessing:[7] If one said the wrong date he is not required to repeat the blessing prior to saying the correct date [in the above example, prior to saying the 4th day], if he did not make an [invalidating[8]] interval of other matters in-between.[9] (This applies even if he had in mind to recite the wrong day at the time of the blessing. Thus, even if he originally thought today is the 5th day and said the blessing and counted the 5th day, and then remembered that today is the 4th day, he is nevertheless not required to repeat the blessing prior to counting the 5th day.[10]) [This applies even if more than Kdei Dibur[11] passed between ending the wrong count and beginning the correct count, nevertheless the blessing is not repeated if an invalidating interval was not made.[12]]

How to repeat the correct date:[13] If after saying the wrong date one remembered the correct date within Toch Kdei Dibur, [which is the amount of time it takes to say the three words of “Shalom Alecha Rebbe”[14]] then he does not need to repeat the counting from the word Hayom and is rather to immediately continue and say the correct number of days. For example, if he remembered within Kdei Dibur to say the 4th day then he is to immediately say “Four days to the Omer” rather than repeating from the words “Today is the etc”.[15] If however one only remembered to say the correct date after the passing of Kdei Dibur, then he must repeat the correct number of days starting from the word “Hayom/Today”.

Summary:

If one recited the wrong date he is to immediately repeat the correct day, as soon as he remembers. If an invalidating interval was made in-between [such as he spoke to a friend of irrelevant matters or switched rooms in between] then he must also repeat the blessing. If an invalidating interval was not made in-between then the correct date is counted without a blessing. If one remembered within the amount of time it takes him to say “Shalom Alecha Rebbe” then he immediately counts the right number without repeating the words Hayom. If not, then he must repeat the correct number of days starting from the word “Hayom/Today”.

Q&A

If one counted the right day and then corrected himself thinking it was the wrong day, may he continue counting with a blessing on the later nights?[16]

Yes.

If one counted two different days due to doubt, may he continue counting with a blessing on the later nights?[17]

Yes.

What is the law if one made a mistake in either the weeks or days, but said one of them correctly?

See Halacha 7!

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[1] See Admur 489:21 “As he said a lie, as today is the 4th day and he verbalized that it is the 5th day. Now, although he had in mind to say the 4th day, it is meaningless, as the Mitzvah of counting Sefira is fulfilled only with ones mouth.”

[2] Admur 489:20; M”B 489:32

Other opinions: Some Poskim rule that one always repeats the blessing if he had in mind the wrong date. [Taz 489:9; See Biur Halacha 489:6 “Oa Ipcha” that negates this ruling]

[3]The reason: As although at the blessing was said on behalf of the wrong day, nevertheless this is meaningless, as matters of the heart are not valid, as explained in Michaber 209:1

[4] Admur 489:21-22; Michaber 489:6; M”B 489:32

[5] Admur 489:21; M”A 489:12; Bach; Levush

[6]The reason: As he said a lie, as today is the 4th day and he verbalized that it is the 5th day. [Admur ibid; Bach ibid; M”A ibid] Now, although he had in mind to say the 4th day, it is meaningless, as the Mitzvah of counting Sefira is fulfilled only with ones mouth. [Admur ibid; Peri Chadash 489:6]

Ruling of Michaber ibid: The Michaber ibid rules that in such a case one does not have to repeat the blessing. Practically, the Achronim question this ruling and conclude the correct day must always be repeated. [see M”A ibid; Taz 489:9; M”B 489:32] To note that according to Admur here one can state there is no dispute between the Michaber and other Poskim as the Michaber refers only to the blessing, and not to the actual counting [of which he too agrees must be repeated] and in truth his ruling is saying that one does not need to repeat the blessing upon saying the correct date, as stated next.

[7] Admur 489:21

[8] Such as he switched houses, or talked of irrelevant matters, then the blessing must be repeated. See Admur 8:21-22; 432:6

[9]The reason: As he fulfills his obligation with the blessing that was already recited. The first [wrong] Sefira that he counted is not considered an interval between the blessing and the true count being that the saying of the wrong date is still considered to be dealing with the matter that the blessing was said over, and it is just that it simply did not come out correctly. [Admur ibid]

[10] Admur ibid, parentheses in original; Mamar Mordechai; Chok Yosef; M”B 489:32 [Vetzaruch Iyun why the M”B in Shaar Hatziyon 489:41 simply writes that so is implied from Admur ibid when in truth he explicitly rules this way!]

Other opinions: Some Poskim rule that one always repeats the blessing if he had in mind the wrong date. [Taz 489:9; See Biur Halacha 489:6 “Oa Ipcha” that negates this ruling]

[11] The amount of time it takes to say the three words of “Shalom Alecha Rebbe”. See next!

[12] So is clearly evident from Admur ibid who does not make any mention of how long the delay can be between the wrong count and correct count and simply states [in change of the wording of the M”A 489:12] that “one did not make an interval in-between of other matters”. Furthermore, in the next Halacha 489:22 Admur explicitly rules this way [in parentheses] stating that if Kdei Dibbur has passed one is required to begin again from the word Hayom, and not from the blessing. So also rules the Mamar Mordechai 489:8 and so writes the Kaf Hachaim 489:77 in the opinion of Admur.

Other opinions: Some Poskim rule that whenever Kdei Dibbur has passed from the end of the wrong count and the new count, then the blessing must be repeated. [implication of M”A 489:12; Chayeh Adam 131:9; M”B 489:32; Piskeiy Teshuvos 489:18] Vetzaruch Iyun Gadol on the M”B in Shaar Hatziyon 489:40 who states Admur is of the opinion that one only has Kdei Dibbur to repeat the correct date when in truth it is clearly evident otherwise, as records the Kaf Hachaim ibid.]

[13] Admur 489:22; M”A 489:12

[14] Admur 206:3; Kneses Hagedola 206; Olas Tamid 206:3; M”A 206:4; Elya Raba 206:5; Chesed Lealafim 206:3; Ben Ish Chaiy Balak 3; Kaf Hachaim 206:15; 582:9

Other Opinions: Some Poskim rule that it contains four words “Shalom Aleichem Rebbe Mori”. [Beis Yosef in name of Shivlei Haleket; Levush; Taz 206:3; P”M 487]

[15] Admur ibid; M”B 489:32 in name of Admur ibid and Derech Hachaim

Other opinions: Some Poskim rule that if one already said the word “Sheheim” in his counting then he is to repeat from the beginning. [Nimukeiy Orach Chaim 489:4]

[16] Piskeiy Teshuvos 489:18; Shevet Hakehasi 1:150

[17] Nitei Gavriel 35:20; As it is a Sfek Sfeka, as it is disputed in Achronim as to whether one fulfills his obligation with a questionable count.

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1 Comment

  1. Shoshana

    If I counted the wrong day and only realized the next night, I will be counting without a brocha from now onwards.
    Is the counting still considered to be a mitzvah?

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