Must inedible products be Kosher for Pesach? i.e. Shampoo, soap, perfume, deodorant, facial creams, oils and cosmetics: Full Article

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Must inedible products be Kosher for Pesach? i.e. Shampoo, soap, perfume, deodorant, facial creams, oils and cosmetics:

In the production of many products today, Chametz ingredients may be added. This is most common with products that contain fragrances, of which their main ingredient is ethyl alcohol or ethanol, a possible Chametz byproduct made from Chametz grains.[1] Likewise, some products may contain powdered starch that derives from Chametz flour, and hence the question arises as to whether these products may be owned or used over Pesach.

 

Owning:

General law of inedible Chametz: All Chametz that has become inedible even for dogs before the 6th hour of Erev Pesach, is permitted for one to own and benefit[2] from, on Pesach, although it is Rabbinically forbidden to eat it intentionally.[3] If however, the Chametz has not become inedible for dogs, then it is Biblically forbidden to own, benefit or eat on Pesach.[4]

Rule of Chametz mixed into inedible products: The above prohibition against owning Chametz that is still edible for dogs only applies to an actual visible piece of Chametz that is not [disintegrated] and mixed into another [inedible] item. However, if even complete Chametz which was fit for eating became mixed into an item that is not edible for people at all, or is not edible for all people, such as medicines [i.e. Tiraka[5]] which are eaten only by the sick, then it is permitted to own it on Pesach. This applies even if the mixture contains much more than a Kezayis of Chametz within Achilas Peras [i.e. more than 27 grams of Chametz per 176[6] grams of the product].[7] [This however only applies if the Chametz ingredient is disintegrated and cannot be separated from the mixture. However, if the Chametz ingredient has retained its texture and can be removed from the mixture, then it is forbidden to even own such a mixture.[8] Accordingly, all non-edible products, such as cosmetics, shoe polish, soap, shampoo, deodorant, and any matter of the like, may be owned throughout Pesach even if they contain a Chametz ingredient, as their Chametz ingredient cannot be separated from the mixture. Despite the above, the standard sale contracts of Mechiras Chametz sell such products to the gentile.[9] Practically, however, it is unclear as to why this is done.[10]]

 

Eating:[11]

Inedible Chametz and Chametz mixtures remain [Rabbinically[12]] forbidden to be intentionally eaten [or tasted/licked[13]] on Pesach.[14] This applies even if the mixture only contains a minute amount of Chametz [to the point that there is 60x against it in the mixture], if the Chametz placed into the mixture is part of its normal ingredients, such as is common in certain medicines[15] [like the Tiraka] and other mixtures of the like. In such a case, the Chametz is not nullified to the other ingredients [irrelevant of ratio], as explained in 442:6. [The same applies if the Chametz was purposely placed into the mixture in order to be allowed to eat it on Pesach, then it is not nullified even in 60x.[16] However, if the Chametz is not a normal ingredient for this product and it was placed into it purposely in order to eat after Pesach, then if the Chametz is nullified in 60x before Pesach it is permitted to even eat on Pesach.[17]]

Accidental eating-using Chametz ink:[18] One may write with a pen that contains Chametz ink that was manufactured before Pesach. We do not suspect that one may moist the pen using his tongue and thus consume the Chametz ink, as even if he were to do so, it contains no prohibition, as he has no intent to consume the ink.[19]

 

Benefiting from the product:[20]

Any [Chametz product] which is permitted to be owned [over Pesach] one may likewise receive benefit from it on Pesach. Thus, for example one may sell it to a gentile, or receive from it another form of benefit. [Accordingly, on Pesach one may sell all non-edible products, such as cosmetics, shoe polish, soap, shampoo, deodorant, and any matter of the like, even if they contain a Chametz ingredient. One may likewise use the product for whatever purpose he desires. Regarding smearing the product on the body-See Q&A]

 

Summary:

All non-edible products that contain disintegrated Chametz may be owned and benefited from throughout Pesach. This applies even if the product is edible for a dog. It however may not be eaten, even if inedible for dogs. Thus, one may own and benefit from cosmetics, shoe polish, soap, shampoo, gas, deodorant, and anything of the like even if they contain a Chametz ingredient. Regarding smearing the product on the body-See Q&A

 

Q&A

May non-edible Chametz products [i.e. Shampoo, soap, deodorant, facial creams, oils and cosmetics] be used on the body?[21]

The letter of the law: Some Poskim[22] rule that smearing is similar to drinking by all Kashrus prohibitions even if the food is now inedible. It is possible[23] to deduce according to these Poskim that just as one may not eat non-edible Chametz products, similarly one may not smear them on his body. Accordingly, one may not wash his body with Chametz soap, shampoo, or spray himself with Chametz cologne, perfume, and the like. Majority of Poskim[24], however, rule that smearing is not like eating in this regard and it is thus permitted to even initially use any of the above items on one’s body, and so is the implied opinion of Admur.[25]

The custom: Practically, the widespread custom is to be lenient during the regular year regarding non-Kosher inedible products[26], and so is the custom of some also on Pesach. However, some are stringent in this matter even during the year[27], and so has become the widespread custom regarding Chametz on Pesach.[28] Some Rabbanim[29] conclude that so is the proper custom to be stringent, as the Arizal states[30] that it is proper to be stringent like all the stringencies on Pesach, and so is the practical custom of many today.

What products are included in the stringency? This applies to all products that clearly have a Chametz ingredient, or who have an alcohol/perfume additive which most likely come from Chametz. However, those products which do not have any Chametz listing, or alcohol/perfume additive, are permitted to be used.[31] Those who desire to be stringent are to purchase all body products with a Hashgacha for Pesach, if available.

Medicinal purposes:[32] Even according to the stringent opinion, it is permitted to smear Chametz containing creams on one’s body for medicinal purposes.[33]

Using them on one’s lips or mouth: According to the lenient opinions, it is permitted to use inedible Chametz products even on one’s lips, so long as one does not have intent to swallow the item. Nonetheless, the meticulous are careful to buy such items Kosher for Pesach.

 

How to tell if a product may have Chametz ingredients:[34]

The following products may contain Chametz in their ingredients, and therefore those who are stringent to not use Chametz products on their body are to try to purchase such products with a Hashgacha for Pesach: Any product that contains alcohol [ethyl alcohol or ethanol], or a scent, fragrance or perfume. In general, such products are made using Chametz alcohol. The following products do not have any worry of containing a Chametz ingredient and hence do not require a Hashgacha even according to those who are stringent: Products that do not list Chametz, alcohol, scents, fragrance and perfume, and starches in their ingredients, may be used without worry.

 

Q&A on bodily products

May one use or own Chametz based rubbing alcohol?[35]

No.[36] If, however, it is not pure alcohol one may use it.[37]

 

May one own cosmetics, shoe polish, soap, shampoo, creams, medicine, toothpaste, on Pesach, if they contain Chametz [i.e. ethyl alcohol]?

Yes, as explained above! This applies according to all. Despite the above, the standard sale contracts of Mechiras Chametz sell such products to the gentile.[38] Practically, however, it is unclear as to why this is done.[39]

 

May one use non-Kosher for Pesach deodorant, facial creams, oils, and cosmetics?

Yes. However, some are stringent in this matter, as explained above. 

 

May one use/own perfumes colognes over Pesach?

The ingredients: One of the main ingredients in perfumes and colognes is ethyl alcohol [i.e. ethanol], which serves as a carrier of the fragrance of the perfume or cologne. It accounts for up to 20-95% of the perfumes content and is known as the perfume compound, as opposed to the perfume base which provides the fragrance and accounts for 5-80% of the perfume.[40] Ethyl alcohol is produced from grains such as corn, wheat, barley and rye. In the USA, almost all ethyl alcohol is produced from corn and not from other grains, although some may use wheat in production. In Europe, it is common to use some other grains together with corn in their ethyl alcohol production. Perfumes may also contain poisonous and toxic ingredients as additives, and hence, in general perfumes are not safe for consumption, and are listed as a product that requires calling poison control if consumed.

The law: Some Poskim[41] rule it is forbidden to use or own perfumes on Pesach, unless they have been verified to not contain a Chametz based alcohol. If, however, the perfume contains ingredients that make it unfit for consumption, then from the letter of the law, they do not contain an owning or using prohibition, as explained above. Practically, the custom is to include all Chametz containing perfumes in the Mechiras Chametz sale.[42] Those perfumes that are verified to not contain a Chametz based ethyl alcohol, may be owned and used according to all.

 

May one use non-Kosher for Pesach medicinal creams?[43]

Yes. This may be done according to all even if the product contains Chametz alcohol.

 

May one use non-Kosher for Pesach eardrops/eye?[44]

Yes, as stated above regarding medicinal creams.

 

Q&A on products of the mouth

Does lip stick need a Hashgacha for Pesach?

From the letter of the law, it is permitted to be used even if it contains a Chametz ingredient.[45] Nevertheless, many are stringent in this matter, including those who are normally lenient in using non-Kosher for Pesach products on their skin.

 

Does chap stick need a Hashgacha for Pesach?

From the letter of the law, it is permitted to be used even if it contains a Chametz ingredient.[46] Nevertheless, many are stringent in this matter, including those who are normally lenient in using non-Kosher for Pesach products on their skin.

 

Vaseline:

Vaseline made of 100% petroleum jelly does not contain Chametz and may be used on the lips.

 

Does toothpaste or mouthwash need a Hashgacha for Pesach?[47]

From the letter of the law, unflavored toothpaste and mouthwash are permitted to be used without a Hechsher, just as is the law during the year.[48] Nevertheless, many are stringent in this matter, including those who are normally lenient in using non-Kosher for Pesach products on their skin. This especially applies towards flavored toothpastes and mouthwashes, in which case they may require a Hechsher from the letter of the law.[49]

 

May one lick the back of stamps and envelopes which have a suspicion of containing Chametz ingredients on its adhesive part?

Some Poskim[50] write against doing so as their glue may contain Chametz.[51]

 

Does Dental floss require a Hashgacha for Pesach?[52]

No, unless it is flavored.

 

May one smoke tobacco/cigarettes?

Tobacco, and many cigarettes contain Chametz ingredients, such as fragrances made from Chametz alcohols, as well as cigarette paper coated with starch.[53] Accordingly, the custom is to be stringent to only smoke cigarettes that have been authorized for use over Pesach.[54] However, from the letter of the law, if the Chametz ingredients that are added are not edible, there is room to be lenient.[55] This may not apply if a Chametz based starch is added to the paper, in which case the starch never loses edibility and would be under Biblical prohibition against eating. The above is only from a Chametz perspective. However, smoking is forbidden throughout the year due to the health risks that it entails.

 

May one smell snuff/Tobacco?[56]

Yes.[57] It does not require a Hashgacha.

 

Q&A on home products

May one use non-Kosher for Pesach dish soap for washing dishes and cutlery?

From the letter of the law, one may use non-Kosher for Pesach dish soaps to wash his dishes and cutlery.[58] Nevertheless the custom is to be stringent.[59]

 

May one use non-Kosher for Pesach bleach, furniture and window cleaning sprays, floor detergent and matters of the like?[60]

Yes. This applies according to all.

 

May one use non-Kosher for Pesach detergent to clean his clothing [in cases permitted on Chol Hamoed]?

Yes.[61]

 

May one use non-Kosher for Pesach starch to iron his clothing [in cases permitted on Chol Hamoed]?

One may only use a corn starch-based starch and not a Chametz based starch. See Chapter 1 Halacha 2C where this matter was discussed in length.

 

May one own or use Play dough/Play-doh:

Play-doh is made up of actual Chametz. It is made of flour, water and food coloring.[62] It must be destroyed before Pesach or sold to a gentile.[63] If one did not do so, then he is to destroy it on Pesach as soon as he remembers[64], without reciting the blessing.[65] If one sold his Chametz, then the play-doh is to be placed in the area sold to the gentile.

 

Pesach Barbecue-Does Charcoal require a Hashgacha for Pesach?

Charcoal briquettes: Charcoal briquettes [square shaped manufactured charcoal, typically used for barbecues] are compressed together using a starch binder, most notably corn or wheat starch.[66] Accordingly, it is proper for one to use charcoal briquettes that have a Hashgacha for Pesach to verify that they do not contain a Chametz starch which will then enter one’s food.[67] [The Eida Hachareidis provides supervision over certain companies of charcoal, to enable its use for Pesach.] Certainly, one may not use unverified charcoal briquettes that were produced during Pesach.[68] Nonetheless, those who are lenient to use any charcoal that was produced before Pesach have upon whom to rely.[69] A company who was verified to use corn starch in their production, may have its charcoal used on Pesach even according to Ashkenazim who avoid Kitniyos.[70] [The company Kingsford[71], which is the leading charcoal manufacturer in the US, manufactures its briquettes using corn starch, and hence their products do not pose any Halachic issue.[72] One can contact any given company to verify its status.]

Lump Charcoal: Lump charcoal does not require a Hashgacha, as it is not known to contain any problematic additives. [The company Rockwood[73] does not manufacture briquettes, and hence all their products are lump charcoal which do not pose any Halachic issue.[74]]

 

Q&A on paper ware and tablecloths

Background on Starch:[75]

Many paper products are made and coated with starch to act as a binder and add to their smoothness and softness. Starches come from a variety of grains, including corn, potato, and wheat. Although only wheat-based starches are a problem during Pesach, many starches used in the paper industry today are wheat based. Being it is difficult to ascertain the type of starch used, therefore, products that contain starch are not to be used on Pesach if they can come into contact with your food.

Testing for starch: It is possible to check items for starch in the following method: Poor some Iodine, found in Polydine ointment, into water and then dip the product being tested into the water. If the product begins turning blue, it is a sign that it contains a starch and should not be used with foods over Pesach.

 

List of products that may contain Chametz based starch and are not to be used unless verified?[76]

·         Paper ware.

·         Tissues.

·         Paper Napkins.

·         Paper rolls.

·         Paper lining.

·         Plastic gloves.

·         Tablecloths [Accordingly, new tablecloths should be washed prior to use on Pesach.[77]]

 

May one eat on non-Kosher for Pesach plastic/paper plates and cutlery?

Plastic plates and cutlery may be used without a Hashgacha for Pesach. Paper plates, however, may contain Chametz starch and are hence to only be used if they contain a Hashgacha, or have been tested to not contain starch.[78]

 

May one use non-Kosher for Pesach Styrofoam plate?[79]

Yes, all types may be used.

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[1] Ethyl alcohol is produced from grains such as corn, wheat, barley and rye. In the USA, almost all ethyl alcohol is produced from corn and not from other grains, although some may use wheat in production, and so is common in Europe to also use some other grains together with corn in their ethyl alcohol production.

[2] Admur 445:11 and 442:24 “Any item that is permitted to be owned on Pesach may likewise be benefited from”; Michaber 445:2; Pesachim 21b

[3] Admur 442:21 and 32-34; 433:25 and 445:4 and 11 and 466:3; Michaber 442:9 and 445:2; Pesachim 21b; Rif Pesachim 13b

The reason: As if the Chametz is inedible even to dogs by the time the obligation to destroy Chametz arrives, then this obligation does not befall onto this form of Chametz, as it does not have a status of food and is considered like mere dust. [Admur ibid]

[4] Admur 422:21; Michaber 442:2; Pesachim 45b

The reason it is not considered Chametz Nuksha: The above spoiled Chametz is not considered under the category of Chametz Nuksha being that it was originally fit to be eaten. Chametz Nuksha only refers to Chametz that from the time of its initial leavening it was not fit for eating unless in a pressing situation. Such Chametz was never fit for regular eating in its entire leavened lifespan. However, Chametz that was fit for eating even for moment during its leavened lifespan, remains forbidden even after spoilage for human consumption. [Admur ibid]

[5] The Tiraka was a medicine made from various herbs, including the flesh of a certain snake and crumbs of Chametz. [Rabbeinu Manoach on Rambam 4:10; Ritva Pesachim 45b] See here: https:::he.wikipedia.org:wiki:%D7%AA%D7%A8%D7%99%D7%90%D7%A7;

[6] Seder 8:2 in parentheses that a Peras is “Three Kebeitzas.” This is the second opinion in Admur 612:4

Understanding the above calculation-How much is a Kebeitza in grams: A Kebeitza is two Kezeisim. Now, see Shiureiy Torah 3:8 that regarding bread a Kebeitza is measured as 57.6 grams. Thus, three Kebeitzim of bread is 174 grams. [See Kaf Hachaim 208:53]

[7] Admur 442:22; Michaber 442:1 and 4; Rambam 4:12

The reason: Although it is Biblically forbidden to own a mixture of food that contains a Kezayis of Chametz within Peras, nevertheless, in this case it is permitted, as since the Chametz is no longer fit for eating, it has thus lost its Chametz texture, and is no longer Halachically defined as Chametz at all [i.e. it has lost its Toras Chametz]. [Admur ibid; Michaber 442:1; This wording implies that the lack of the texture is a result of it losing its edibility. Vetzaruch Iyun, as what is the connection between the two; a food can retain its structure and still be inedible? However perhaps Admur is saying that being that it is no longer edible, therefore its loss of texture has Halachic meaning to remove it from having din of Chametz, as opposed to if lost its texture but is still edible, like when it was mixed in a dish, then although technically its texture is not seeable, nevertheless since it’s still edible its considered as if it’s still there. Accordingly, we learn from this case that if even complete Chametz became inedible to humans and lost its texture, it is no longer Chametz, just like Chametz that is inedible for dogs [but retains its texture] is no longer Chametz. Perhaps, the reason for this is because once its texture is lost its considered destroyed just as one of the ways of destroying Chametz is by crumbling it and throwing it into the air. Similarly, here, once its texture is lost its considered destroyed. Nevertheless, this only applies if the Chametz also becomes inedible, as part of the destruction process [throwing to air] is that it no longer be fit for any human to eat. Accordingly, even if it lost its texture, if it still remains edible, like in a case that it was mixed in a food, then it is still Biblically forbidden as Chametz. See P”M 442 A”A 2; Vetzaruch Iyun as to why here we do not decree as we do by Chametz Nuksha that since it is forbidden to eat [Rabbinically] therefore one must destroy it, due to suspicion that he may forget and come to eat it. However, seemingly one can answer simply that since it is not a regular food there is therefore no need for the Sages to suspect that one may come to eat it and thus make such a decree. [Chok Yaakov 442:5]

[8] Admur ibid writes the prohibition applies to Chametz Beiyn; See Divrei Malkiel 4:24 footnote 6

The reason: If the Chametz is not fully mixed into the inedible item, and thus some of it remains a solid separate piece within the mixture, then it would be forbidden even to own, as its texture still remains, and Admur implied that one requires both lost of texture and inedibility to remove the Chametz prohibition from the Chametz in the mixture.

If the Chametz is less than a Kezayis within Peras: However, seemingly, if the amount of removable Chametz in the entire mixture is less than a Kezayis within Peras, then it would still be permitted to own if one did bittul before Pesach, just like any piece of Chametz that is less than a kezayis that if one did Bittul to it and its inedible/dirty, then one may own it.

[9] Divrei Malkiel contract in 4:24; Contract of Rebbe Rashab included some inedible products such as medicine, Chametz papers; Contract written by Rav Berel Levin in Tikkunei Mechiras Chametz; Contract of Rav Raskin, with Haskama of Rav Landau; Contract of Rav Landau

[10] As a) It is permitted to own such products, so why sell them? [See Divrei Malkiel ibid. Vetzaruch Iyun Gadol on his explanation] b) People may use these products on Pesach, as permits the letter of the law and come to be stealing from the gentile. C) The Alter Rebbe’s contract did not include such products.

[11] Admur 442:22 and 32; Michaber 442:4; Implication of Michaber 442:9; Taz 442:8; Bach 442; Tur 442 in name of Rosh and Riy Abartzelona; Rabbeinu Yerucham 5:13; Terumos Hadeshen 129; Erech Hashulchan 442:5; Kaf Hachaim 442:99

Other opinions: Some Poskim rule the food is permitted to even be eaten if the Chametz was nullified before Pesach. [Rama ibid; See Poskim in Kaf Hachaim 442:48]

[12] Kaf Hachaim 442:48 and 99; Admur in Kuntrus Acharon 442:12 who implies the entire prohibition against eating the Tiraka is Rabbinical even if it contains a Kezayis within Peras. The reason for this is because the Chametz is considered destroyed from a Biblical perspective and it is only due to Achshavei, or due to lack of Bittul, which is a Rabbinical prohibition, that it is forbidden to eat the inedible Chametz mixture. [See Admur 442:33] This concept of Achshavei only applies when eating a product and not when benefiting from it.

[13] Rama Y.D. 108:5; Shach 98:24; Rivash 288; Kaneh Bosem 1:25 that this applies even for an Issur Pagum, as we apply to it the rule of Achshavei

[14] The reason by inedible Chametz: Although if the Chametz became inedible even for dogs before the 6th hour on Erev Pesach it is permitted to own on Pesach, nevertheless, it is forbidden to be eaten, as although it’s not [Biblically] considered food at all, nevertheless, since the person intends to eat it, he gives it a status of food, and it is thus Rabbinically considered for him like complete food due to the thoughts that he has of eating from it. [Admur 442:32; Taz ibid; Terumos Hadeshen 129; see Rama Y.D. 155:1]

The reason by edible Chametz added to an inedible mixture: If edible Chametz is intentionally placed into a mixture, it is never nullified even in 1000x, and hence is Rabbinically forbidden due to Chametz [and not just Achshavei]. [Admur 442:22; This explains why Chametz medicines are forbidden to consume even though we don’t normally say Achshavei when consuming a food for medicinal purposes. Vetzaruch Iyun!] However, other Poskim learn that inedible mixtures that contain Chametz are forbidden due to Achshavei. [M”B 442:21; Piskeiy Teshuvos 442:5 as he understands from Admur]

[15] All Chametz that is added to medicines by doctors and pharmaceutical companies is all considered “a normal ingredient” and is not nullified. [Admur in Kuntrus Acharon 442:11 based on Beis Yosef Y.D. 134 in name of Rashba 3:214]

[16] Admur 442:5; Vetzaruch Iyun why here Admur did not record also this condition

[17] See Admur 442:5-6

[18] Admur 442:34; Michaber 442:10; M”A 442:15; Terumos Hadeshen 129; See Kaneh Bosem 1:25

[19] The reason: As explained above, consuming inedible Chametz is only Rabbinically forbidden due to Achshavei, which only applies when intending to consume the Chametz.

[20] Admur 442:24; M”A 442:7 regarding the Tiraka; Chok Yaakov 447:13 and 18; Implication of Terumos Hadeshen 113; See also

[21] Background: There is a general discussion in Halacha as to whether smearing an item on one’s body is similar to eating it, or not. This concept is called “Sicha Keshtiya.” We find regarding Yom Kippur that Sicha is Keshtiya. The question is whether this applies only to Yom Kippur, or to all Issurim. We find several opinions on this matter: 1) Some Poskim rule it only applies by Yom Kippur, and not by other Issurim even if done for pleasure purposes. [Implication of Admur 326:10 and Rama 326:10; Nekudas Hakesef Y.D. 117:4 that from letter of law is Mutar; Peri Chadash 117:4; Machazik Bracha 614; Tosafos Yuma 77a and Rashba, Ritva, Tosafos Rosh and Meiri on Nidda ibid; Rashbatz; Beis Yosef 123 in name of Rashba] 2) Others rule it only applies to other Issurim regarding forbidden oils and only when done for pleasure purposes. [Tosafos Nidda 32a] 3) Others rule it applies by all Issurim. [Beis Yosef 117 in name of Orchos Chaim p. 312] 4) Others rule it applies by all Issurim when done for pleasure purposes. [Taz 117:4; Issur Viheter 39:34; Semag; Semak; Zivcheiy Tzedek 117:45; Gr”a O.C. 326:10; Aruch Hashulchan 117:29; Kaf Hachaim 117:15] Some Poskim rule that according to the stringent opinion this applies even if the Issur is Pagum. [Nekudos Hakesef ibid regarding soap “some are stringent and so is proper”; Shevilei David 117:2; Biur Halacha 326:10 “Viassur” and “Beshaar Cheilev” in name of Gr”a O.C. 326:10 regarding using non-Kosher soap; M”B concludes custom is to be lenient although best to be stringent] Other Poskim rule that even according to the stringent opinion it only applies to other Issurim if the Issur is edible and not Pagum. [Peri Chadash 117:4; Soles Belula 35:13; Beis David 23; Tzemach Tzedek [Kadmon] 60; Aruch Hashulchan 117:29; Kaf Hachaim 326:45; 117:17; Shevet Halevi 6:114] Other Poskim rule that by something that is so Pagum that it is not edible to a dog then the concept of Sicha Keshtiya does not apply according to any opinion. [Aruch Hashulchan ibid seemingly even according to Nekudos Hakesef and Biur Halacha ibid; See also Shevet Halevi ibid]

[22] Poskim in previous footnote who forbid Sicha by all Issurim in accordance to the Poskim who apply this even to Pagum items: Nekudas Hakesef Y.D. 117:4 regarding Chazir soap; Shevilei David 117:2; Biur Halacha 326:10 “Veassur” and “Beshaar Cheilev” regarding using non-Kosher soap. The M”B ibid concludes that the custom of the world is to be lenient [regarding soap] and only the meticulous are careful in this. Nevertheless, he concludes that if one is able to purchase Kosher soap then certainly it is proper to suspect for the stringent opinion.

[23] It is only possible, as perhaps we can accept the argument of the Aruch Hashulchan ibid that a completely Pagum item does not have an Issur of Sicha Keshtiya according to anyone.

[24] All Poskim in previous footnotes who only apply the prohibition of Sicha Keshtiya to Yom Kippur, or to a non-Pagum item or to oil. Shoel Umeishiv Mahadura Gimel 2:148 regarding soap; Chazon Nachum 46; Yalkut Yosef p. 360; Piskeiy Teshuvos 442:2

[25] See Admur 326:10 “[However] according to those who [held there] that the reason for the prohibition of crushing snow and hail is because of a decree made [to safeguard one from coming to] squeeze fruits which are designated for their juices, and snow and hail are likewise designated for their liquids as was explained there [in 320:19], [then according to them] soap and other Cheilev which are not designated as liquids are permitted to be [even] initially crushed.”

[26] Bach ibid; Nekudos Hakesef ibid; Biur Halacha ibid; Aruch Hashulchan ibid

[27] Nekudos Hakesef ibid; The Chabad Rebbeim were stringent in this matter even regarding soap during the year. This however was not a directive to the public. [Heard from Rav Eli Landau Shlita]

[28] Piskeiy Teshuvos 442:2 as can be seen from the fact that the contracts all include the sale of these items

[29] Nitei Gavriel Teshuvah 6 [volume 3 p. 393]; Heard from Harav Eli Landau Shlita that on Pesach the custom is to be stringent in this, in light of the ruling of the Arizal

[30] Arizal, brought in Shut Admur 6

[31] Heard from Eli Landau Shlita

[32] Igros Moshe 3:62

[33] The reason: As we do not apply the rule of Sicha Keshtiya when it is smeared for medicinal purposes. [ibid]

[34] Heard from Rav Eli Landau Shlita

[35] Igros Moshe 3/62

[36] The reason: As it is drunk by people in times of need for alcohol and therefore it may not be used and must be sold before Pesach. [Igros Moshe ibid]

[37] Igros Moshe ibid

[38] Divrei Malkiel contract in 4:24; Contract of Rebbe Rashab included some inedible products such as medicine, Chametz papers; Contract written by Rav Berel Levin in Tikkunei Mechiras Chametz; Contract of Rav Raskin, with Haskama of Rav Landau; Contract of Rav Landau

[39] As a) It is permitted to own such products, so why sell them? [See Divrei Malkiel ibid. Vetzaruch Iyun Gadol on his explanation] b) People may use these products on Pesach, as permits the letter of the law and come to be stealing from the gentile. C) The Alter Rebbe’s contract did not include such products.

[40] These numbers have been publicized in the poison control centers official website. Similar numbers are brought in perfume making websites [20-50% alcohol]

[41] Divrei Malkiel 4:24 states that many are accustomed to use perfumes over Pesach even though they contain Chametz. He protests against doing so claiming they transgress the owning and benefiting prohibition, as they smell the fragrance which is dissipated by the alcohol.

[42] Divrei Malkiel contract in 4:24; Contract written by Rav Berel Levin in Tikkunei Mechiras Chametz; Contract of Rav Raskin, with Haskama of Rav Landau; Contract of Rav Landau

[43] Igros Moshe 3:62

[44] Igros Moshe 3:62

[45] As a) It is not edible even for dogs. [Petroleum, which is an active ingredient in wax and lip stick, is poisonous for dogs, and is unhealthy for human consumption] and therefore b) Even if one swallows some of it, since he had no intent to do so, he has not transgressed. [Admur 442:34 regarding ink that contains Chametz]

[46] As a) It is not edible even for dogs. [Petroleum, which is an active ingredient in wax and chap stick, is poisonous for dogs, and is unhealthy for human consumption] and therefore b) Even if one swallows some of it, since he had no intent to do so, he has not transgressed. [Admur 442:34 regarding ink that contains Chametz]

[47] See Kaneh Bosem 125; Piskeiy Teshuvos 442:10; Madrich of Eida Hachareidis

[48] As a) It is not edible even for dogs. And therefore b) Even if one swallows some of it, since he had no intent to do so, he has not transgressed. [Admur 442:34 regarding ink that contains Chametz] Now, although in this case one is intentionally placing the product in his mouth, nonetheless, as proven from the source of Admur in the Terumos Hadeshen, it is nevertheless allowed as he has no intent to benefit from it. [Kaneh Bosem ibid]

[49] If the flavoring contains Chametz, perhaps we would apply the concept of Achshavei towards tasting it, and it is forbidden to even taste an Issur. [Kaneh Bosem ibid]

[50] Teshuvos Vehahagos 225

[51] However, based on Admur 442:32-34, that the prohibition is only to intentionally consume the inedible product, one should be allowed to lick the stamps if they contain inedible Chametz.

[52] Madrich of Eida Hachareidis

[53] Admur 467:24 and M”A 467:10 regarding tobacco, that it is commonly soaked in barley and is hence to be put away in a closed room or behind a Mechitza; Sdei Chemed 1:3; See Beis Meir 467; Maharm Shick O.C. 242; Halef Lecha Shlomo 204; Divrei Chaim Y.D. 20; Orchos Chaim [Spinka] 467:21; Kaneh Bosem 1:25

[54] Admur ibid; Nitei Gavriel Pesach 1; Heard from Harav Eli Landau; See Otzer Minhagei Chabad 23 that the Rebbe Rashab would smoke on Pesach. The students would sift it to make sure that there is no Chametz contained in it.

[55] One may smoke them being that one does not have intention to eat it, and by inedible items only if one has intention does it become prohibited to eat. [Admur ibid]

[56] See Beis Meir 467; Maharm Shick O.C. 242; Halef Lecha Shlomo 204; Divrei Chaim Y.D. 20; Orchos Chaim [Spinka] 467:21; Kaneh Bosem 1:25

[57] The reason: As even if the product contains Chametz, it has been destroyed, and is thus not prohibited in benefit, and smelling is considered benefit and not eating. [Halef Lecha Shlomo] Alternatively, smelling an Issur is considered an irregular for of pleasure which is allowed. [Maharam Shick ibid]

[58] The reason: Being that the soap is not fit for eating, and even if some of it gets on the food, it does not pose an issue being that one does not have intention to eat it.

[59] Nitei Gavriel Pesach 1; Hakashrus

[60] Nitei Gavriel

[61] Nitei Gavriel As even if they contain Chametz the detergent is not edible and even if it falls into one’s food one has no intention to eat it.

[62] Ingredients provided by the play-doh company, “Hasbro”: The compound is primarily a mixture of water, salt, and flour. Home-made recipes will include salt, flour or corn starch, a vegetable, canola, or olive oil, and cream of tartar. 

[63] Play-doh is consumable and does not contain any poisons or dangerous material for a human. It must thus be destroyed just like a piece of actual dough. It is not covered by the allowance of owning Chametz that is not food, which is brought in 422:22, because that refers to Taaruvos Chametz, and play-doh is Chametz Beiyn. However, it may be viewed as Chametz Nuksha since it is not meant to be eaten and thus resembles the dough made by the Sofrim, mentioned in 442:20, which is Chametz Nuksha. Therefore, although it must be destroyed or sold to the gentile before Pesach, if one did not do so and found play-doh on Pesach, it is to be destroyed without a blessing, as is the law by Chametz Nuksha in 442:20.

[64] Admur 442:20

[65] Admur ibid

[66] The charcoal making process: Charcoal is produced by drying wood, such as timber wood, and then heating the wood to a very high temperature until it blackens. The wood is then crushed into pieces of ash and combined together into small squares, known as briquettes, using a starch binder, either of corn or wheat.

[67] See Rabbi Blumenkrants Pesach digest p. 10-306

The reason: Although the charcoal is not edible, and is hence like all non-food products that are permitted to be owned and benefited from, nonetheless, they remain Rabbinically forbidden to be intentionally consumed due to Achshavei. [See Admur 442:22 and 32-33; 445:11] Now, since the coals release heat and smoke through which the food is cooked and flavored, the food certainly contains taste of the coal, which would include taste of the starch that is in it. One cannot argue that the Chametz starch is nullified to the other ingredients and hence permitted in use, as an intentional ingredient is not nullified even in 1000, even regarding the Rabbinical concept of Achshavei. [Admur 442:22] Now, although one can argue that perhaps the concept of Achshavei does not apply in such a case, as there is no actual starch that enters one food, and it is merely the burnt taste that penetrates, and hence we find ruled in 445:11 that one may cook using Chametz charcoal that was created prior to the 6th hour of the 14th, nevertheless perhaps that only applies in previous times when the intent was not to add flavor of the ash to the food, and it was simply the only cooking method available. However, by today’s charcoal, since one certainly intends to enter the flavor of the coal/ash into the food [as this is one of the prime reasons people grill using charcoal-so it receive a smoked flavor] perhaps this would contain an Issur of eating due to Achshavei. In addition, regardless of the above, the custom is to abstain from using Chametz charcoal for cooking over Pesach, even if it became charcoal before Pesach. [Admur 445:11 and in Siddur; M”A 445:4; Tur 445; Maharshal; Maharil; P”M 445 A”A 4] The reason for this is because one may come to end up using Chametz charcoal that was created on Pesach. [Beis Yosef 445; P”M ibid; Rebbe in Haggadah] Accordingly, one is to abstain from using charcoal briquettes that do not have a Hashgacha.

Can one use a corn starch bound briquettes? Yes, as a) The Kitniyos is not edible once mixed with the ash and we do not find the concept of Achshavei regarding Kitniyos, which is a mere Minhag. b) Kitniyos is nullified in majority. [See Admur 453]

[68] Admur 445:8 “Even the ash and charcoal of the Chametz are forbidden in benefit”; Many companies ship the briquettes the same day of production.

[69] The OU and CRC both write that charcoal does not require a Hashgacha for Pesach.

The reason: As the simple understanding of Admur 445:11 is that one may cook using Chametz charcoal, irrelevant of whether it adds flavor to one’s food. The reason for this way of understanding is possibly due to that the Rabbinical prohibition of Achshavei does not apply to the smoked flavor of a product, and only when eating the actual Mamashus. This is in addition to the fact that some Poskim rule it is permitted to even eat Chametz that was destroyed before the 6th hour. [See Peri Chadash and Rashbatz, brought in Kaf Hachaim 442:99] Now, although earlier we stated the custom is not to use Chametz charcoal even if it was burnt before the 6th hour, nevertheless, perhaps this custom would not extend to this situation.

[70] See previous footnotes

[71] See https://www.kingsford.com; Currently, the Kingsford Products Company remains the leading manufacturer of charcoal in the US, enjoying 80 percent market share.

[72] Verified to me through a written correspondence with the company At this time, we do not claim to be gluten free.  We can confirm that we use corn starch to bind the char in the briquettes.  We do not use wheat starch.”

[73] See http://rockwoodcharcoal.com/; This is a S.L. Missouri based company.

[74] Verified to me through a written correspondence with the company “You are correct that briquettes use binders such as potato or corn starch to bind them together…..some use a dextrin product (which ultimately comes from starch or gluten, I believe.)  The good news is, we use NONE of that as we do not produce briquettes.  Our charcoal is natural lump.  It’s just wood that has been carbonized to remove the moisture, tars, & liquors.  It has ZERO fillers, binders, or additives such petroleum, starch, borax, limestone, etc.  100% natural untreated wood in ours. Our lump charcoal is probably the most natural and organic products you could ever buy, as it’s mostly carbon…..the basis of all living organisms.”

[75] Heard from Harav Eli Landau Shlita

[76] Heard from Harav Eli Landau Shlita

[77] Nitei Gavriel 77:17

[78] Nonetheless, from the letter of the law they may be used if the starch has already spoiled. [See Nitei Gavriel]

[79] Rabbi Blumenkrantz digest

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